Back to the Beginning

Just after I graduated college I lived in Chicago for a couple of years, and I had this notion of doing comics. I spent about a year working on this silly superhero comic that I thought was about all sorts of things (the rise of multinationalism and the corporatization of the media), but was really about nothing. I had a friend named Brad, who I talked comics with. I showed him this superhero comic, and over drinks at a bar, he said, “You shouldn’t do any more comics like that. It’s not very good.”

And as soon as he said it I knew he was right.

Which started me off on a whole new direction. I had this idea comics that worked more like poems or songs. No need for a narrative. No need for character names. The only goal was to get at an emotion as raw and pure and undiluted as possible. There were some successes, and some failures.

And it was these comics that lead to my first book with NBM, Flower and Fade. The title of which was taken from D.H. Lawrence:

“Life and love are life and love, a bunch of violets is a bunch of violets, and to drag in the idea of a point is to ruin everything. Live and let live, love and let love, flower and fade, and follow the natural curve, which flows on, pointless.”

I was very serious.

01 These Days

My First Comic

My very first comic ever was Asterix and the Great Crossing by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo. The early part of my life was spent in Saudi Arabia and I was exposed more to comics from Europe than from the U.S. This was the book that my parents read to me over and over again before going to bed.

Basically, I was an American kid growing up in a Muslim country looking at ridiculous Native American caricatures written and drawn by French men in a comic that featured no female characters whatsoever.

Very worldly.

Asterix -16- Asterix and the Great Crossing - 17

Striking Out

This Wednesday I’ll be talking along with Joel Gill at the Cambridge Public Library at 6:30. We’re going to be discussing our paths to comics as well as a bit about process like this little bit of strike out research I did for All Star. You should come join us.

Strike Out Reference

Nobody struck out better than Reggie Jackson. Look at those feet! He’s got himself so twisted up, just imagine how far that ball would have gone if he had hit it.

 

Talking Comics at the Cambridge Public Library

Jesse-Lonergan-and-Joel-Gill

So if you’re in the Boston area next Wednesday, you should come by the Cambridge Public Library and say hello to me and Joel Gill. We’re going to be talking about our books, our process, and our upcoming projects, which are both westerns.

 

 

Steven Spielberg/Woody Allen

Sometime, maybe ten years ago, I read or heard this quote from Woody Allen which went something like this: Steven Spielberg says he tries to make the films he loved as a kid. I try to make the films I love as an adult.

And at the time, I was in total agreement with Woody Allen, but now I think I’m coming around to Steven Spielberg’s way of thinking.

These are some pages from this fun little Formula 1 book I’m working. It’s very boyish.

(Also!)(I’ll be doing a talk with Joel Gill at the Cambridge Public Library on June 25th!)(We’ll be talking about my book, All Star, and his book, Strange Fruit!)(!)

Untitled-1 Untitled-2

 

Projects in the Works

All Star’s out and in the stores, so I’m getting cracking on some new projects.

A little bit of wild west revenge, and a little bit of high speed 60s Formula 1 racing.

20140601_073238 20140601_072920

And belatedly, here’s a podcast featuring an interview with me at TCAF:

http://www.jimmyaquino.typepad.com/comicnewsinsider/2014/05/episode-539-more-tcaf-w-.html

And a podcast featuring the Sports in Comics panel I was on at TCAF:

http://www.jimmyaquino.typepad.com/comicnewsinsider/2014/05/episode-540-tcaf-sports-vs-comics-panel-w-wai-aubox-brownreinhard-kleistjesse-lonergan.html