Starred review for Why I Killed Peter from PW + other reviews

Publisher’s Weekly has this week given a starred review for Why I Killed Peter, calling it “hauntingly evocative. Ka is unable to ignore his past any longer and decides to tell his story, teaming with artist Alfred to create a graphic memoir. Alfred’s blending of ink drawings and digital photographs in the final gut-wrenching scenes are perfect visual complements to Ka’s voice, which shifts effortlessly from the innocence of childhood to the responsibilities of adulthood.”

Another recent review:

“The sensitivity with which Ka and Alfred handle this real-life moment is astonishing. And the way the graphic novel plays out, with art eventually giving way to photographs taken of the actual spots where some of the story takes place, is powerful. There will be those who cannot get through the book, overwhelmed by the story and the emotional content, but for those who do, they are in for a unique graphic novel experience. ”

Marc Mason, Comics Waiting Room

Also. Andrew ‘Capt. Comics’ Smith of the Scripps-Howard News Service says of David B’s Nocturnal Conspiracies: “Recommended.”

Watch for an interview of David B. to go up on Graphic Novel Reporter soon!

“When all seemed lost, he does get the girl, the cake, or the dog.”

We’re talking about Happy Holigan here and this is from a great review in the California Literary Review:

“Seen in the context of this long tradition, Opper ultimately created a great gag, a caricatured layabout with an appalling taste in orange polka dot undershirts. Viewed in retrospect, post-Depression, however, he acquires a special poignancy.

Here was a man who was only ever trying to help, never asking for favors, loved by children, and here was a society intent on beating him down. The line between comedy and tragedy is a fine one, and Hooligan’s lines were pretty fine.

Yet Opper was nothing if not smart, and knew we could only put up with so much. Rarely, just rarely, the schmuck from Brooklyn gets a break. In isolated strips, when all seemed lost, he does get the girl, the cake, or the dog. ”

The Review gives our collection 4 stars out of 5.

I’m tellin ya, it’s a classic not to be missed!

Terry

See us at NY Comicon!

We’ll be at booth 1713 in a well placed corner, have our latest books out both for NBM and for our sister publishing co. Papercutz.

For NBM that means having Miss Don’t Touch Me, Nocturnal Conspiracies by David B, Happy Hooligan and fresh in: LITTLE NOTHINGS 2 by Lewis Trondheim! We’ll also have Neil Kleid of Brownsville and other comics with Slave Labor, Image, etc… Publisher Terry Nantier will be there, ready to chat with you.

For Papercutz, the big news is we’ll have Greg Farshtey on Saturday, the writer of  Bionicle and of course the latest Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, Tales from the Crypt and Classics Illustrated. Meet also our industry-beloved Editor-in-Chief Jim Salicrup.

See ya there at the Javitts Center Feb. 6-8.

Moresukine reviewed in Daily Yomiuri

The Daily Yomiuri, an English-language Japanese paper ran a long well-illustrated review of Dirk Schwieger’s Moresukine calling it “Highly Entertaining. Amusing look at many aspects of life in Japan.”

It goes on to describe quite a few of Schwieger’s ‘exploits’ under the command of internet readers.

Library Journal on Moresukine

“Throughout, Schwieger shows both funky humor and affectionate awe toward this alien culture immersing him. As popular anthropology, this title will have strongest appeal in collections where manga is hot.”

Says Martha Cornog of Moresukine in an issue of LJ out earlier this month. She reviews graphic novels regularly for Library Journal and other Library publications

Miss Don’t Touch Me gets a star from Booklist

Miss Don’t Touch Me, which has just hit store shelves is starting off its press with nothing less than a starred review from the highly-regarded Booklist, a magazine for Libraries:

“It’s hard to imagine a sequential art story better than this in terms of character development, plotting, realization of settings, and interconnection between visual and narrative elements.The coloring alternately provides glowing light and scary shadows in fine re-creations of crowded streetscapes, the boudoir of a black transgender escort, the depths of the murder dungeon, and a nearby chapel. Police corruption, aristocratic privilege, and petty jealousies among the working girls all figure in Blanche’s efforts to identify Agatha’s killers.”   

 Note from Terry:

I wanted to put in a post before on this book we just shipped. As the above conveys, it’s full of pep, gripping, mischievous and just plain irresistible.  Get back to us on what you think!