Chicago’s Redeye interviews Rall: he was dead on about Afghanistan in 2001

A very important interview just up on Chicago’s Redeye site Chicago Now. It zeroes in on the fact that Ted Rall called it early back in 2001 as can be seen in his ‘instant graphic novel’ we published in 2002 To Afghanistan & Back. Basically he already said it then: ‘we lost this war.’

You’ll remember we all thought we had just won it.

This book is ever more relevant today, check it out. He risked his life going there to see the war with his own eyes, not trusting the news.

And for you Californians, note Ted Rall will be appearing at the D.G. Wills Bookstore, 7461 Girard Avenue, La Jolla, Ca. 92037 (858)456-1800
Friday December 11 at 7PM

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‘A gorgeous whirlwind of a memoir’, Publishers Weekly interviews Rall

Sasha Watson, a well known author in her own right, calls Ted Rall and Pablo Callejo’s The Year of Loving Dangerously ‘a gorgeous whirlwind of a memoir’ and does a great interview of Rall in Publishers Weekly’s Comics Week.

And don’t forget, Ted appears at MoCCA Thursday evening at 7PM to talk about and then sign this book!

Geary makes top ten list, Things Undone rave from Booklist

Shane White’s Things Undone has an excellent review to its credit in the influential Booklist:
“This indie graphic novel has high appeal, especially for Rick’s peers. His gradual zombification is slyly funny without becoming grotesque.”
Booklist

And SF Site has put Geary’s latest Famous Players in its top ten list. The paperback of this is just out!

Sequential Tart on O

Sequential Tart has a very well researched review, brings up some interesting background.

“The story stands the test of time, partly because it is a catalogue of classic pornographic and Sadean tropes (Susan Sontag called The Story of O “meta-pornography”), but also because it has a purposely retro feel. Crepax gives the comic a flapper-era aesthetic that calls upon a timeless, iconic era of libertine feminism.

Crepax, who was a successful advertising illustrator, also knew the power of suggestion. While he does not shy away from explicit depictions of sex and BDSM activities, he also knows when to pull back and let comics do what they do best: allow the reader to imagine what happens between scenes, just outside the panel, in the next frame, or elsewhere on O’s body.
The true selling point of this edition of The Story of O is the production. Printed on a bright white, opaque stock, Crepax’s linework comes to life, with the flow of ink, the physical weight of the hand and turns of the wrist evident in every line.  The NBM edition of The Story of O is a solid, very reasonable priced standalone volume.”

Rall at MoCCA Dec. 3rd

The Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art will host Ted Rall presenting his new book The Year of Loving Dangerously, his graphic memoir on a fateful year where the main issue became basic survival… in a very unusual way. The book is beautifully painted by Pablo (Bluesman) Callejo, a first for Ted to just write.

He will talk in person about that year, what it meant to him and the not easy process of bringing this all back up. You can see from recent posts that it’s already garnering great reviews.

So, if you’re in nyc Thursday Dec. 3, come meet Ted Rall and get him to sign some books by him that MoCCA will have which we’ve donated to them to help them raise money.

Newsarama on Rall’s Year

While saying this may fall short of a must-read, Michael Lorah at Newsarama says:

“Rall does a fine job laying out the story, weaving his year of dangerous love with flashbacks that explain his predicament. It’s an impressive balancing act, and he makes it work. The dialogue is convincing, and most of the women are presented as realized, if perhaps needy, young ladies.

If you’re a fan of comic memoirs, yet maybe a little sick of socially inept, nebbish autobio, Rall provides an effective antidote. “

massively amusing

“You can’t get enough of these characters from page to page; you want to read what other sick shit the Holiest of Holies has gotten himself into lately. You want to see the Boss Karate Black Guy Jones tap some tail and kick some fat ass. Houston’s art is just as exaggerated and over-the-top as his stories, and every character receives the royal and perverted treatment. Tits are huge, wrinkles and saggy jowls are pronounced and packages are spared no expense. Jones’ outfit of platform heels, pin-striped bell bottoms and UFO style afro alone helps make the book massively amusing.”

Comics Waiting Room

“Through White’s impeccable dark humor asnd expressive cartoon-styled art, Rick Watts lives the grand collection of life’s little disasters that are instantly recognizable in our own lives. *** 1/2”

Karen O’Brien, Comics Buyers Guide