Publisher’s Weekly “The Fanatic” previews The Silent Invasion

Great News! The Great Fear, Book 2 of The Silent Invasion is released this month (May)! The Fanatic, Publisher’s Weekly’s online newsletter about graphic novels contains a special preview of The Great Fear. Check it out
 here (then scroll down to the Panel Mania section at the bottom of the page. and click on the image for the full preview).

Stay tuned and, watch the skies!!

For more information on The Silent Invasion click here.

You can follow us on Facebook as well.

You can find Larry’s previous blog posts here

And posts by Michael Cherkas, here

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Love is coming!

My newest book, on Love this time, will hit bookstores in June! It will be first available at the TCAF comic con in Toronto on May 11 & 12, which Yiri and I will be attending (find us at the NBM booth for a chat!).

love-cover

The first review, from Publisher’s Weekly is already in, and I’m really happy that they call it upbeat, good-natured and affable:

The latest in de Heer’s series of simple, cheery graphic novel guides to big topics like science, philosophy, and religion finds the Dutch cartoonist tackling the meaning of love. Taking her own romantic history and current relationship with her husband (and colorist) Yiri Kohl as the opening story, she expands into such subjects as the history of marriage, the chemical components of desire, the seven kinds of love identified by the ancient Greeks, and the Kama Sutra and Song of Songs. Her gesticulating cartoon avatar shares her expertise on romance novels and attends a speed dating event. It’s an upbeat and good-natured sampling of issues related to partnership, lust, and romance, but the topic of love is far too vast to be covered satisfyingly in a 120-page comic. The broadly smiling, roly-poly cartoon characters and bright colors make the arguments accessible to a fault. Ultimately, the cartoon version of de Heer reaffirms her relationship with Kohl, but she doesn’t come to any conclusions that could be considered truly universal. While affable, this is an unchallenging ramble through a topic that could easily provide fodder for an entire separate series of graphic investigations.

It is true that I found it hard to come up with truly universal truths about love. In my own experience, the subject is so complex, that when you want to condense it you either have to describe purely scientific facts or stick to personal experience, in order to avoid reverting to platitudes. In this book (as in all my books), I’ve done both: the broad view with facts such as the history of marriage, contents of the Kama Sutra and chemicals in the brain, AND my own personal story of being in a long-term relationship with Yiri.

prologue

sweet

Will our marriage withstand the onslaught that is the Seven Year Itch…? Read all about it in ‘Love – a Discovery in Comics!’

leaving

Oh, and I also threw in a few frivolities, such as this:

jealousy

Of all of my books, this is the one I had most fun with drawing. I hope lots of readers will LOVE it!

 

The Story of Lee in a Scottish newspaper

Our book THE STORY OF LEE is mentioned in this article that just came out, in one of Scotland’s biggest national newspapers, with an image from the book featured too.
Volume 2 and volume 3 (coming out next month) are set in Scotland, of course.
me herald article jan 2019
Thanks all – Sean

Starred Reviews Provide Accolades For ‘Monet: Itinerant of Light’

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One of our most exciting 2017 releases was Monet: Itinerant of Light from writer Salva Rubio and illustrator Efa.

Itinerant of Light chronicles the life of the great French painter Claude Monet, one of the founders of Impressionism.

Here are three notable reviews:

Booklist (starred review)

Monet has loudly maintained, all along, that he’s the leader of the impressionists. But in 1880, six years after the first impressionist show scandalized the critics, Renoir convinces him he can’t continue fighting old battles. Like Renoir and also Sisley, Cézanne, and Pissarro, Monet has to make a living, and staying with the impressionists is guaranteed poverty. Besides, most critics were starting to warm up to impressionism. Before Efa and Rubio get there, though, they dwell on Monet’s early years of struggle, beginning with his 1862 arrival in Paris and extending just beyond his first wife Camille’s death, in 1879. And well they should, for Monet’s long road to success is a real-life artistic legend that ranks with those of Beethoven, Brahms, Van Gogh, and very few others. Framing it with Monet’s double cataract-removal in 1923, Rubio and Efa insert several masterpieces in the background and let their subject’s obsession with light enrich their fine work of mainstream European comics. An appendix discusses the background paintings, the originals of which appear alongside Efa’s adaptations and sometimes by themselves. Because Efa injects so much of Monet into his own style and Rubio presents fact as fact and conjecture as conjecture, many may think this the best of the many recent comics biographies of artists.

 

Library Journal (starred review)

For their English-language debut, Spanish creators Rubio and Efa join forces in this biography of French painter Claude Monet (1840–1926), one of the founders of impressionism. The story opens with Monet as an old man recovering from cataract surgery. As he awaits the return of his eyesight, he reminisces about his past. What follows is a pretty straightforward telling of his life, from his early days as a rebel student to his relationships with fellow artists Camille Pissarro, Auguste Renoir, and others. We witness his early struggles, financial hardships, creative conflicts, and eventually great success, all in an effort to capture the light and beauty in nature. Monet himself narrates, and most of the text focuses on that narration, which allows the imagery to open and explore much of the same visual landscape that occupies his paintings. Efa’s illustrations are stunning; full of strong, lush color and bold impressionistic brush strokes that call forth Monet’s style but never imitate. Many panels are designed to resemble the painter’s work in order for us to see the world as he did.
Verdict This beautiful, evocative story will please fans of biography, art history, and impressionism. Highly recommended.

 

Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)

This evocative homage to one of the titans of modern art is both a collectible and a joy to read. As an aged Claude Monet endures temporary blindness after cataract surgery, he reviews his past: stubborn struggles against the fossilized art establishment, painfully impoverished and transient family life, and the devout (even obsessive) pursuit of natural light in his painting. One of Monet’s early works gave the name “Impressionism” to the innovative approach of a group of young artists who wanted to catch on canvas the immediate visual impact of experience. Efa captures some of that fresh outlook in his luminous illustration of Rubio’s intelligent biographical script, and a well-selected gallery section that follows the narrative lets readers follow Monet’s astonishing efforts to establish himself as an artist, which culminated in his creation of a perfect painterly environment in his estate at Giverny. The large-format binding allows room for the dynamic panel and color design. The quality of the loving production make this a landmark in serious comics about art.

Breaking the 10 review

Breaking the 10 volume 2 is available now in Diamond Dec Preview catalog.

And here is their mention of volume 1, which is listed again this month:

b10 vol 1 diamond review

Get volume 1 and 2 in Decembers Previews catalog, page 377,

Code for volume 2: DEC17 1696

With Volume 1 of the book re-listed, code: DEC171697

NBM’s page for the book HERE

And more pages from the book can be seen on my website HERE

NYTimes still ghettoizes comics and graphic novels

While we’re very happy our sister co. Papercutz and its SuperGenius imprint got The Wendy Project into a GN roundup in the NYT Book Review this Sunday, I was shocked to still see NOT ONE graphic novel makes the 100 notable list for 2017 in that same issue.

And its editor-in-chief professes to be a fan. So what? When all you do is a once in a blue moon ’round-up’ for graphic novels, rarely it seems covering in full reviews any. Or did I miss anything?

Meantime, the Washington Post has Michael Cavna regularly talking about them, reviewing them, same can be said for other newspapers. Although I will say there are a number of important ones out there that are just as clueless in how to get a younger audience interested in their publications as comics and pop culture coverage would appeal to them.

Oh yes, George Gustines gets to do the occasional news piece… every few months (!).

Lack of depth in coverage of graphic novels is just, well, infuriating, knowing the great work from all over the world being published in our medium.

[revised 12/4 seeing a couple GNs did appear in the Children’s list].