Ink

So this weekend I finally had some time just to sit and think. I moved back to Boston last Sunday: packing unpacking, organizing, making lists of all the things I need, finding out where I can buy all those things that I need, figuring which combination of walking, bus and subway gets me to work the quickest. Then on Tuesday I was back at work teaching ESL and coming up with lesson plans and figuring out how to explain the present perfect progressive tense to a class of Brazilians (plus one Korean student and one Chilean student). Then on Thursday it turned out a friend of mine from the Peace Corps had a ticket to the Red Sox game. Then on Friday I went to the bar after work and didn’t leave until it closed (but I wasn’t drinking alone)(it was just the first Friday night back in the city). Saturday was spent… well, I got out of bed pretty late.

But now it’s Sunday and I find myself with a little time on my hands.

And my mind asks, “what’s next?” now that the Turkmenistan book is completed. Do I launch into another graphic novel? If so, do I do that book about baseball I’ve been thinking about, or that road book I’ve been meaning to do, or do I make a complete left turn and do some sci-fi silliness? Or do I forget graphic novels for a little bit and focus on smaller things? Or do I just sit on my porch for a bit with my guitar and sing songs while girls walk by in their summer dresses?

Writing the options down it seems obvious what I should do.

Which means I need to tune that guitar.

Anyway, I’ll still be posting comic about comics here and if you want to check out the random drawings I do you can head over to my blog.

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Omnivoracious on 5 years of Dungeon

It’s true, we haven’t made that much about it, but with Dungeon Zenith, vol.3, we reached a milestone: 10 volumes, 5 years of publishing the series.

Omnivoracious, the book blog on Amazon is good to right that wrong with columnist Jeff VanderMeer saying:

“One of my great reading pleasures this decade has been the discovery of Dungeon in the lovely little volumes from NBM Publishing, which provides English translations of this near-iconic series originally released in France. This month, you could do worse than check out the whole series, as NBM is celebrating five years of Dungeon with the tenth volume, Zenith: Back in Style.

Dungeon is the brainchild of French geniuses Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim. Part of their brilliance in creating these books is to both send-up the heroic fantasy genre and provide one of the most compelling arguments for its relevance.

I’d be content just to have the next ten translated in, oh, I don’t know, the next six months. Short of that happening, I’ll have to console myself by re-reading the existing ten…”

Oy, go easy on us.

Welcome, Shane

And as you said in your entry below, welcome back… um… from the dead? Well I guess that’s in tune with the new book you’ve got coming in August.

Wait, everyone, to see when he posts some pages, this is in a completely different more cartoony style than he used in North Country (where he already varied styles somewhat depending on circumstance). Shane is a remarkably talented guy!!

Back from the Dead

Hi.

It’s been awhile since my last graphic novel, North Country in 2005.

Almost 4 years to the day all this will be coming together again. Unlike North Country though, Things Undone is a dark comedy. The story at it’s core is about change, and how people have a hard time dealing with it.

In the next several weeks I’ll share a little bit about the process with you as well as some of the preproduction art.

=s=

Publishers Weekly on Dungeon Zenith 3

The raves continue for the Dungeon series. Its newest volume, the 3rd in the Zenith branch, is praised in this week’s issue of Publishers Weekly:

“It’s hard to say if Sfar and Trondheim’s long running Dungeon epic is a dead-on parody of sword-and-sorcery cliches or if it’s just a first-rate fantasy series that happens to star anthropomorphic animals and involves lots of comedy.

Boulet handles the action set pieces and slapstick farce with equal aplomb, and Trondheim and Sfar shake up the tone of the story every few pages: there’s romance next to brutal violence, and tender whimsy punctuated by cruelly bleak humor.”