Dungeon: Twilight Takes Its Final Bow

Hi, I’m Jeff Whitman. I’m the new Publishing Assistant at NBM Publishing, here to post the latest and greatest releases NBM has to offer. I will also share with you exclusive info and previews when I can. I have to admit I am new to the world of Dungeon. I just read the finals for Dungeon Twilight Volume 4 and got instantly curious about the whole series of work. Read on!


 

The Dust King, Marvin the Red, Zakutu and all your favorite Dungeon dwellers return for one final adventure! What has been called “the looniest world of horror and heroic fantasy you’ll ever be transported to” has captivated international audiences for years. And now, the saga concludes with Volume 4 of Twilight, containing two stories: High Septentrion and The End of Dungeon. Join NBM as we celebrate, one more time, the fun and dangerous world that was created by Johann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim over 15 years ago! The End of Dungeon arrives in fine comic shops starting in November, bookstores come December.  Preorder today at your favorite comic shop or bookstore!

DUNGEON: Twilight Vol.4

DUNGEON: Twilight
Vol.4: High Septentrion & The End of Dungeon
Johann Sfar, Lewis Trondheim, Alfred, Mazan.
The last two stories of Dungeon!
In High Septentrion, there has been a violent eruption on the planet of Terra Amata. It’s a scramble to find breathable air, but the wizened blind, mystical dragon the Dust King (Marvin) thinks that it is perhaps time for him to die heroically. However the feisty young Marvin the Red refuses to give up and plans to find a way out of this mess, including finding a way to actually breathe… Art by Alfred of “Why I Killed Peter.”
And in The End of Dungeon the more the islets of the planet Terra Amata move upward, the less there is of breathable oxygen. While Marvin the Red and Zakutu, daughter of the Grand Khân, attempt to protect the seven objects of Destiny, Herbert and the Dust King are forced to swear allegiance to the Dark Entity in order to gain access to breathable air. 
All things must come to an end and so it is with the great Dungeon.
6 ½ 9, 96pp., full color pb, $14.99, 9781561639199

Click here for previews and more Dungeon fun!

Why I Killed Peter reviewed by Library Journal

“Alfred’s charming, emotional color art captures wonderfully Ollie’s youthful joy and psychological turmoil. Sensitive. Recommended for older teens and up.”

So says Library Journal of Why I Killed Peter about the author’s experience with abuse at the hands of an otherwise cool priest.

This only adds to the great press this book had gotten, including The Onion, a starred review from Publishers Weekly, the Miami Herald and many prominent websites.

It should be noted there is little in this book that could prove visually offensive.

Why I Killed Peter gets 4 stars from Comics Buyers Guide

The latest issue of Comics Buyers Guide makes Why I  Killed Peter a pick of the month, gives it a full 4 stars and calls it “One of the best autobiographical graphic novels. In fact, it may actually be the best.”

If you haven’t checked this out yet, it’s a very sensitive rendering of a fairly shocking experience.

Miami Herald on Why I Killed Peter

“If there is a healing process, this unforgettable graphic reminiscence is surely its catalyst. Collaborator Alfred evocatively illuminates Ka’s memoir of childhood innocence and grown-up pain. Special mention must be made of his extraordinary use of color and photography as magical elements to convey the emotional ambiguity and banality of evil.”

So said Richard Pachter of the Miami Herald on Tuesday of Why I Killed Peter.

Why I Killed Peter gets rave attention

Reviews for this book are rolling in at quite a clip!

“Highly successful both as literature and visual art, this is a book to recommend to abuse survivors as well as readers who appreciate exploring life’s difficult realities.”

Booklist

“touching story of trust and betrayal.”

Litmob

“It’s a strong and important book, and above all, yet another testament to the power of this medium.”

Daily CrossHatch

“The ink vanishes; the trees become doodles. The colors are dabs of paint. Something is accomplished. Ka’s story, so ferociously arranged to address its center event, can only stop; a final image freezes Ka’s age, his many selves gathered together. The book is done. It’s all out of him. It’s something else. He killed it.
It’s absolutely harrowing material.”