Two views on The Broadcast

“Hobbs’ brilliant, character-driven script weaves a tight psychological thriller that at once feels both intimate and epic. Although, on the surface, Tuazon’s raw, cartoony style may seem like a mismatch for Hobbs’ tight, sophisticated script, the contrast in artistic sensibilities only underscores the intense emotions lurking beneath the plot’s surface. Tuazon’s use of ink washes and inspired panel construction lends an air of atmospheric claustrophobia that truly helps the book achieve its distinct feeling of epic intimacy. Having experienced his art, it’s hard to imagine a “cleaner” artist achieving Tuazon’s depth of atmosphere and expressiveness within the confines of Hobbs’ plot.

A deceptively simple, exquisitely crafted OGN, The Broadcast is a tightly scripted, beautifully rendered self-contained tale, that doesn’t require prior knowledge of the characters and setting to be carried away by the story. Hobbs and Tuazon have realized in their efforts a shining example that sometimes less is more – even when there’s more lurking beneath the surface of the story than meets the eye.”

Broken Frontier

Not everyone agrees on Tuazon’s art, alas Booklist says:

“Writer Hobbs has a sure hand with characterization and adroitly sustains the suspense. Unfortunately, his story is not well served by Tuazon’s artwork. While his layouts propel the narrative effectively, the actual illustrations more resemble sketches than finished drawings and the lack of clarity often makes it difficult to distinguish between characters or follow the action, which diminishes the impact of what is otherwise a taut, socially conscious parable.”

One might get that first impression, but in fact, as Broken Frontier so expressively expains, Tuazon’s art, which may need some getting used to, fits, in that its very sketchiness adds to the confusion and immediacy, a little like a hand held camera on a running camera-man makes the experience all the more unsettling…

We agree to disagree, Booklist!

reviews: Booklist on Geary, Mr. Easter, The Broadcast, Miss Don’t Touch Me

Another rave for Geary’s latest The Terrible Axe-Man of New Orleans, this time from the influential Booklist:

“Geary’s archly antiquated drawing style is ideally suited for bringing bygone eras to vivid, convincing life. Geary’s exacting, historically accurate approach makes this—as well as his other nonfiction works—a natural for true-crime fans as well as comics lovers.”

About Brooke A. Allen’s A Home for Mr. Easter,  Library Media Connection, respected reviewer for Librarians says:

“Recommended. Brings a fresh look to the genre with dark humor and the realistic dreams of any young person struggling to fit in.”

Bill Sherman on Pop Culture Gadabout, as well as blogcritics, about The Broadcast:

“Imagine the original Night of the Living set in the Depression — and without any fleshing-eating ghouls – and you have a sense of what Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast (NBM) is about.”

A belated but yet timely review of Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.1 by Andrew Wheeler. Timely because it’s coming back to press next month along with the release of the new vol.2:

“So this is a French book — it has what counts as a happy ending, with the villains routed and their plans foiled, but it also has a deeper sense that some villains are never really routed, only pushed away, so that their next evil acts will be done somewhere else, to someone else. And that may be the best that we can hope for — that we know why our sister died, and did as much damage to the people responsible for that death as we could. It’s a fine, thoughtful, nuanced and unflinchingly clear-eyed book, not least interesting as a story deeply sympathetic to women.”

Booklist on Networked & more

“This cautionary tale outstrips simple purposefulness to provide a rip-roaring good story. Without resorting to didacticism or slowing the action, each character provides a point of view that requires careful reader evaluation to weigh the thoughtful mix of fact and opinion. This package offers much for casual readers as well as book groups and curriculum designers.”

Booklist about Networked.

And Blogcritics has this to say about it:

“In the world of Networked, the enemy of personal freedom is less our government and more avaricious moneymen (in collusion with the gummint, of course) looking for ways to mold a compliant consumer class. In its way, this book reads like a lighter updating of seventies era paranoid movie thrillers like The Conversation. Some story conflicts never lose their relevance — unfortunately.”

Booklist on Networked

“This cautionary tale—a project of PrivacyActivism, a group dedicated to online privacy education—outstrips simple purposefulness to provide a rip-roaring good story. Offers much for casual readers as well as book groups and curriculum designers.”

Booklist On Networked, Carabella on the Run, at your store now, and from us.

On the Odd Hours reviewed

First of all, Booklist says of this new book out now in our Louvre collection:

“Virtuosically rendered by Liberge, who merges elegant clear-line
figuration, expressionistic pastel coloration, and in the odd-hours sequences, superimposition effects, Bastien’s story powerfully expresses the irrepressible life of great art.”

Comics Worth Reading adds, after a few reservations:

“Yet I was left impressed by how well comics worked to tell the story of a deaf man. Illustrated sign language is perfect for the format. It reinforces the lack of sound, making it something in itself, to exploit and manipulate, instead of a characteristic of the medium covered up by lettering effects. When his girlfriend argues with him, images spill around her as her hands gesture at him and captions explain what she’s communicating.”

After that, in this piece covering also our Joe & Azat and Year of Loving Dangerously, she is less kind on those.

Much Ado about Little Nothings.

“A giant in French comics, Trondheim  has always been a marvelous observer of the extraordinary little moments in everyday existence. All rendered in the simple but expressive and versatile style that has always been one of his greatest strengths.
Verdict: Recommended for those who appreciate low-key but charming autobiographical comics.”

 Library Journal

“Trondheim’s third collection of musings on his personal life maintains its predecessors’ high caliber of narrative and art.  All of which entails swimming with sharks, coping with giant spiders, obsessing about consumerism while engaging in gadget lust, watching the family cat prey on a bird, and lots more equally engaging and ironic adventures.”

Booklist

JOE & AZAT visit Publishers Weekly and RALL on Booklist

Ted Rall and Pablo Callejo’s The Year of Loving Dangerously just keeps getting the accolades, the latest from Booklist:

“He was more interested in well-stocked refrigerators than impending sexual adventures. Realistically illustrated in soft colors by Callejo, of Bluesman (2004–06) fame, and maximally unbuttoned in some places, Rall’s sympathetic account of his life on the edge encourages identifying with a situation so desperate that his outrageous choices seem necessary.”

And Publishers Weekly thought Jesse Lonergan’s Joe & Azat equally charming:

“Lonergan follows his graphic novel, Flower & Fade, with this charming and engrossing study of a friendship that transcends cultural borders. A simply illustrated charmer that grips readers from its opening pages and remains on the mind well after it has been read and absorbed.”