Breaking the 10 vol 2 nice mention

Nice of Down the Tubes website to do a page on our BREAKING THE 1O book:

down b10

Click on the above image to go to the web site.

Order it from Previews December Customer Order Form, page 27 (or p377 in the full catalogue), under the publishers name ‘NBM'(and with a cute ‘Certified Cool’ stamp of recommendation). Diamond Code: DEC17 1696

With Volume 1 of the book re-listed, code: DEC171697

2B10_013lo

NBM’s page for the book HERE

 

Advertisements

Breaking the 10 volume 2 – listing now!

After quite a bit of difficulty and rearranging of the book’s ending Volume 2 of our BREAKING THE 10 is finished… and is presently listed in this month’s Previews catalogue from Diamond distributor.

p102lo

Order it from Previews Customer Order Form, page 27 (or p377 in the full catalogue), under the publishers name ‘NBM’ (and with a cute ‘Certified Cool’ stamp of recommendation).

Diamond Code: DEC17 1696

With Volume 1 of the book re-listed under code:  DEC171697

 

b10 vol 2 diamond listing

Despite the trouble we had I’m very proud of this book and really looking forward to seeing volume 2 come out printed well.

Nice!

NBM’s page for the book HERE

And more pages from the book can be seen at my WEB SITE

B10 vol 2 listing

Workshop

I rarely give workshops for kids anymore, but when I was invited by my local primary school for an interview with the editors of the school magazine, I thought it would be a good idea to make the event into a mini-workshop. And it worked out great!

workshop01

There were six kids and they were all so enthusiastic and creative! One of them even had made me a special drawing, with me in it!

superstriptekenaarworkshop07

I had not really planned anything solid, but as soon as I drew some examples of how you can set up your own comic character, they were off…

workshop-collage

If there’s anything I like to get across about drawing comics, it’s to have FUN with it. Fun always translates. The rest is just handy tips & tricks about using thick markers so your lines are solid, adding black to make it look instantly professional, and putting jokes in.

In the meantime, they asked me questions for the school paper interview. They ranged from “Do you have hobbies beside comics?” (Yes: writing) to “Is that your real hair color?” (No).

At the end, I offered to make them all a drawing per their request – and the result reads almost like a comic:

drawings

Lots of thanks to the Rosa Boekdrukkerschool in Amsterdam and Mechteld Jansen, who helps out with the school paper and invited me to do this. It was great fun!

PRIDE lives!

Copies of Pride Of The Decent Man are beginning to arrive in the hands of readers. This is feels like the end of something, but also the beginning of another stage – promotion!

It’s actually been two years (!) since sending off the initial short proposal for the book, and now it’s done, real, and ready to be (hopefully) enjoyed by the public.

I’ll be making my first two appearances in support of PRIDE soon at the Small Press Expo in Maryland and the Brooklyn Book Festival in NYC. Details to come very soon!

I’m also posting a new tour poster image I’ve got with some other dates as well. More are being added soon.

Pride Of The Decent Man is now available through many fine booksellers.

For more info, go here.

Thanks again – and thanks for reading.

T.J.

picture

flyer small

The Importance of Seeing It Through

I’ve illustrated only a few graphic novels. There are cartoonists that can produce an astonishing amount of pages every year. On the flipside there are cartoonists who take a decade to produce their magnum graphic novel opus. I’m not the fastest, but I’m also not the slowest. Speaking from experience, I’ll add that having a child can slow you down your productivity a bit. The most important thing to do when you’re working on a graphic novel is to simply finish it.

There was an interview in The Comics Journal years ago with Aaron Renier – I’m paraphrasing of course, but he was talking to a fellow cartoonist, the talented Craig Thompson. He was offering advice while Aaron struggled with his debut graphic novel, Spiral-Bound.

I can tell you from experience, It’s difficult, grueling and daunting. The sheer amount of work is overwhelming. Craig Thompson worked on many comics that he abandoned before finishing his breakthrough, Goodbye, Chunky Rice. He realized that the most important part is to finish things. You have to see it through. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. There may be weeks where you get nothing done, or days you lose because you realize the storytelling didn’t make sense. Even though you may like the drawing itself, you’ve gotta throw out the page and start over.

To have a finished book, to hold it in your hands – it’s like crossing that finish line. You, can’t get there, however, if you don’t stick with it. If you’re a flake, if you don’t commit to the work, you can never finish. You simply have to chug along, do the work. See it through.

To find out more about my new book, PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, including how to order a copy, go here.

 

Writing It Down & The Origins Of PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN.

Ideas for books come and go, but I’ve learned that if you don’t write them down, they’ll fly away out of your head pretty quickly. If you don’t write it down, it just doesn’t exist.

Every idea I’ve had for a comic, I first wrote down in a small, simple notebook.

My favorite place to exhibit ( and buy ) comics is the Small Press Expo in Bethesda, Maryland. I like to have something new every time I go – to be excited about showing people your new work is a great feeling. When it came time to exhibit in 2014, I wrote and illustrated a small eight page quarter-size mini comic called TURNPIKE. It featured a nameless ‘homeless guy’ and a lonely teenager named Julie. The story evolved from those few scribbled down notes into a story.

color 1

I received a lot of good feedback about that minicomic. One cartoonist I respect a great deal told me it was very good and ‘indicative of a larger story.’

That got my wheels turning in the weeks afterward, and in 2015 I put together a proposal for a graphic novel called NEVER FORGET TO REMEMBER.

rough cover

 

It connected the two main characters in TURNPIKE and expanded on some of the themes and visual elements. I included the first ten finished pages of the book, as well as a synopsis, character descriptions, character designs, and a cover mockup.

It all started as a few hastily-scribbled sentences in a notebook, and soon evolved into a real project. NBM responded favorably and the title was eventually changed to PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN.

 

pridecover

 

 

 

 

Ghetto Brother at Black Comic Book Festival

BCBF16

Next Saturday, January 16, Harlem’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture will host the 4th annual Black Comic Book Festival.

At  noon John Jennings will moderate a panel on “Comics and Matters of Social Justice and Activism” with Julie Smith, writer of Hafrocentric, Bill Campbell of Rosarium Publishing, and Julian Voloj, author of “Ghetto Brother”.

If you are in New York, don’t miss this event.

When? Saturday, 1/16/16 — 12 PM – 1:15 PM

Where? Schomburg Center, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC