I heard a voice…

One of my favourite things about our BREAKING THE 10 series for NBM is putting in jokes and farcical aspects along with the serious points questioning religion.

This is page 1 of a scene in volume 2 when David announces his new Korean goddess.2B10_055 korean1

NBM’s page for the book HERE

And more pages from the book can be seen at my web site

 

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Librarians of taste

Nice to see our book with NBM picked in the ALA midwinter show. Those librarians have taste!

library show denver

 

Volume 2 of our book BREAKING THE 10 came out this month.

“David becomes increasingly more desperate, with his extreme behaviour causing fights with everyone who cares for him: with the devilish Mr Black and the saintly Mr White and even with his loving parents. But his quest goes on, driving him to break the rest of the 10 commandments in order to draw out the elusive divinity to face a grief stricken man. Until, finally, he is faced with the most serious commandment all: ‘Thou shalt not kill.’
Will he do it? Or will God stop him?”

 

NBM’s page for the book HERE

 

And more pages from the book can be seen at my WEB SITE

 

Breaking the 10 volume 2 – listing now!

After quite a bit of difficulty and rearranging of the book’s ending Volume 2 of our BREAKING THE 10 is finished… and is presently listed in this month’s Previews catalogue from Diamond distributor.

p102lo

Order it from Previews Customer Order Form, page 27 (or p377 in the full catalogue), under the publishers name ‘NBM’ (and with a cute ‘Certified Cool’ stamp of recommendation).

Diamond Code: DEC17 1696

With Volume 1 of the book re-listed under code:  DEC171697

 

b10 vol 2 diamond listing

Despite the trouble we had I’m very proud of this book and really looking forward to seeing volume 2 come out printed well.

Nice!

NBM’s page for the book HERE

And more pages from the book can be seen at my WEB SITE

B10 vol 2 listing

Background of ‘The Mercenary’

NBM Graphic Novels will be reprinting all 14 volumes of Vincente Segrelles groundbreaking graphic novel series The Mercenary in updated, remastered volumes.

In anticipation of this exciting release, we’re previewing the supplementary pages that will be included in the back of every volume.

To see all posts, click HERE.

* * * * *

merc2When I was little, just like most children, I liked to draw—although in my case it was a somewhat unhealthy hobby. I was born in 1940 and my childhood took place during the Spanish post-war period, an era of hardships and rationing. I remember that, when I was very young, but old enough to remember with some clarity, I secretly got up at 6 in the morning and shut myself in a room so I could draw, making sure to cover the crack at the bottom of the door with a towel so that the light shining through wouldn’t give me away. They found out and my nocturnal adventure was over, but I continued drawing during allowed hours. Storybook illustrations fascinated me and I tried to copy them. Later came comics and especially movies.

And then there was the influence of my uncle José Segrelles, my father’s brother. Uncle Pepe, as we called him at home, was a well-known illustrator in the 1930s, a great watercolor painter specialized in fantasy.

In the apartment where we lived, we had books illustrated by him and a few framed reproductions of his work, but the crucial thing was the artistic atmosphere that I breathed in at home. The “Uncle Pepe” atmosphere, as would be expected, affected me a lot and framed my professional aspirations for the future: my dream was always to be a painter-illustrator.

But life took me down many roads before reaching this profession. My stint in a truck factory and in advertising did not quash my vocation, and in my free time I continued drawing.

And finally I achieved it, first illustrating trading cards, then research books, and finally book covers.

When I reached the comics world, I was already much older than is usual for authors in this specialty, but I had a background of hundreds of covers in a wide variety of topics including fantasy and dragons, some of them mounted and ridden by warriors, iconography that I would use to create samples and to find work in comics.

 

“I remember well when these books first came out. I bought all of them. They had a great influence on me as a painter; also on my interest in sequential art. Vincente Segrelles is a superlative storyteller in both words and pictures. Like the extraordinary art of his Uncle, Jose Segrelles, the work of Vincente is not to be missed!”

– Joe DeVito, creator and illustrator of King Kong of Skull Island

Meet Vincente Segrelles, Creator of ‘The Mercenary’

NBM Graphic Novels will be reprinting all 14 volumes of Vincente Segrelles groundbreaking graphic novel series The Mercenary in updated, remastered volumes.

In anticipation of this exciting release, we’re previewing the supplementary pages that will be included in the back of every volume.

* * * * *

In them I will explain how and why I started The Mercenary, my way of working, anecdotes, and interesting tidbits about the way that I write comics and especially the direct relationship between the issues and my passions. I have illustrated each supplement with many samples my work, and everything that you will see, from the illustrations to the models and sculptures, was done by me.

vincente

The Cult of The Sacred Fire was one of my first introductions to fully painted graphic novels and to this day holds up against the best of them. Segrelles inspired generations to push the art further with this breakthrough book and 40 years later, its looking better than ever. A must-have for any illustrator or storyteller.”

– Jimmy Palmiotti, writer of Harley Quinn; creator of Painkiller Jane

The Importance of Seeing It Through

I’ve illustrated only a few graphic novels. There are cartoonists that can produce an astonishing amount of pages every year. On the flipside there are cartoonists who take a decade to produce their magnum graphic novel opus. I’m not the fastest, but I’m also not the slowest. Speaking from experience, I’ll add that having a child can slow you down your productivity a bit. The most important thing to do when you’re working on a graphic novel is to simply finish it.

There was an interview in The Comics Journal years ago with Aaron Renier – I’m paraphrasing of course, but he was talking to a fellow cartoonist, the talented Craig Thompson. He was offering advice while Aaron struggled with his debut graphic novel, Spiral-Bound.

I can tell you from experience, It’s difficult, grueling and daunting. The sheer amount of work is overwhelming. Craig Thompson worked on many comics that he abandoned before finishing his breakthrough, Goodbye, Chunky Rice. He realized that the most important part is to finish things. You have to see it through. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. There may be weeks where you get nothing done, or days you lose because you realize the storytelling didn’t make sense. Even though you may like the drawing itself, you’ve gotta throw out the page and start over.

To have a finished book, to hold it in your hands – it’s like crossing that finish line. You, can’t get there, however, if you don’t stick with it. If you’re a flake, if you don’t commit to the work, you can never finish. You simply have to chug along, do the work. See it through.

To find out more about my new book, PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, including how to order a copy, go here.