Ephemeral Tidbits – New Reviews For NBM Favorites

It’s always nice to see that a book lives on beyond it’s release date.  Hopefully being shared and recommended to like minded readers.

Teacher Librarian Magazine‘s Joe Sutliff Sanders recently took a look at Sean Michael Wilson and Chie Kutsuwada’s The Story of Lee commenting:

“Drawn with the iconic faces and screen-tones manga aficionados cherish, and written with the sensitivity to the passion of first love, The Story of Lee is a story to move any heart.

Several months after it’s release, Ernie Colón’s Inner Sanctum is still gathering new readers.

“Colón demonstrates his considerable talents and offer(s) sufficient chills to interest even the most jaded horror comics fan…Essentially, Inner Sanctum serves as a showcase for the extraordinary Colón.”

The SF Site

“The stories are a mix of psychological horror (the kind where there’s always a rational explanation for the most irrational-seeming events) and fantasy horror (the kind where the devil really does walk the earth, and vampires are not just the product of overheated, virginal imaginations), with the more successful playing with the boundaries between the two genres. This is a fun volume to read, particularly if you have nostalgic bent.”

PLAYBACK:stl

“Renowned for his intuitive ability to spot the blacks and the use of contrast to help build atmosphere…Colón’s art alone is worth the price of admission.”

Broken Frontier

Altering the support of sounds for the support of pictures is only part of Colón’s work here: his choices of panels and perspectives come to the fore to create a new—but loyal—way of experiencing what started as actor’s voices.

School Library Journal

“It’s fun to see Colón attempting Warren-style horror again, and at the least, the overall gruesomeness and cleverness of these stories might drive some readers to rediscover the radio show.”

Foilball.com

And finally, a new look at the Eisner-nominated On The Odd Hours,

“On the Odd Hours is a nifty graphic novel, full of fascinating scenes that highlight the relationship people have with art and why we care so much about it. I’d definitely Recommend you check it out. It’s more thoughtful and clever than you might expect, and it’s a gorgeous looking comic book, which goes a long way!”

Comics Should Be Good!

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The joy of getting slightly creeped out.

 

Inner Sanctum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Library Journal says of Colon’s Inner Sanctum:

“Colón maintains the period settings and character interactions, while showing how ominous shading, gestures caught in frozen moments, staring yet lifeless eyes, and the confusion between reality and nightmarish deformity convert the tales from ear to page. Colón succeeds in respecting the original tales, his readers, and the joy of getting slightly creeped out.”

Another review on that book raves over his art but is less than sanguine about his writing: Broken Frontier.

 

 

This very same Broken Frontier (on another page), however, praises Salvatore 2 to the Gods:

“Nicolas De Crecy’s romantic comedy tour de force continues with witty aplomb and tongue firmly planted in cheek. Reading Salvatore is like reading a Shakespearean comedy, with De Crecy’s pointed commentary on the human condition coming in the form of clever double entendres, slapstick pratfalls, and calculated exaggeration.”

 

 

 

Stargazing Dog still keeps getting reactions. Modern Dog, a prominent magazine for dog lovers says:
“Anyone who’s ever loved a pet will be moved to tears by the tale of human misfortune and the unwavering dedication of dogs that unfolds  in Murakami’s graphic novel.”

And Chicago’s New City:
“Charming and universally appealing.”

“Female descendants of Max and Moritz”

“Here are the female descendants of Wilhelm Busch’s Max and Moritz. Like Busch’s awful boys, it’s impossible not to cheer these two through all their silliness and well-deserved comeuppances.”

Booklist on Kinky & Cosy.

From Robot 6:

Chris Mautner: “You know who’s great? Lewis Trondheim. Trondheim continues to reveal his life to readers on a weekly basis over at his Web site (and the NBM blog), most of which has been collected in his “Little Nothings” series. The lastest book, My Shadow in the Distance, offers more of the same, and such a wonderful same it is.”

Also on Little Nothings, this from Don McPherson at Eyeoncomics:

“This collection of one-page, slice-of-life cartoons are eminently relatable, and the universality of Trondheim’s ‘toons becomes even more apparent when one considers this book is a translation of work originally crafted and presented in French.”

Bookgasm on Ernie Colon’s new Inner Sanctum, says it’s fun if be it predictable…:

“Colón’s art, however, is a pleasure throughout.” —Rod Lott 

Also on Inner Sanctum from Comics Bulletin:

“This book is a hell of a lot of fun, an anthology of wonderfully drawn short tales, all of which amuse and delight and feature terrific artwork. And Ernie Colón’s storytelling chops are still a glory to behold.”

Paste Magazine on Bubbles & Gondola: “7.2. Full of small surprises, pleasurably mopey.”

Stargazing Dog still gets comments, this from Warren Peace:

“It’s really nice to see a book like this get release on American shores, aspiring to neither high artistic statements or in-your-face excitement, but still lodging itself firmly in the heart.”

The Cleveland Plain Dealer/Cleveland.com calls Salvatore 2 a ‘delightful follow up.”

Catp. Comics, Teacher Librarian and Unshelved on our books (and more)

Ernie Colon gets an excellent interview over at Comics Bulletin by Jason Sacks. And Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith over at Scripps Howard News Service has this to say about it:

“[Colon] can scare the pants off you. I highly recommend “Inner Sanctum,” which ought to come with a reinforced belt.”

Smith (same review) also has come around on Salvatore. Where he hated vol.1, now with volume 2:

“An Eventful Crossing” has changed my mind entirely. All the stories are progressing dramatically and are holding my interest, and what I interpreted as inane, random dialogue in the first book has transformed into solid (and funny) characterization. I was wrong to dismiss this book as an artist’s self-indulgence, and hope now to correct my error. “Salvatore” is initially hard to embrace, because it is a story that refuses to conform to expectation and classification. But it’s that very quality that’s making it a unique and entertaining read for me now.”

Gene Ambaum at Unshelved, a site beloved by Librarians, recommends Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:
“I read everything by Trondheim that’s available in English. But I would have picked this up for the cover alone.”

It is also reviewed at Playback:stl.

Comic Book Resources chooses Rohan at the Louvre as one of 12 to look forward to this year.

“Geary’s historical mysteries always sparkle with clarity, both in the artwork and plot.”

Joe Sutliff Sanders, Teacher Librarian on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti

Inner Sanctum at your comics store now.

Ernie Colon’s latest graphic novel, INNER SANCTUM, hit comics bookstores yesterday, if you haven’t checked it out yet, make sure not to miss it, it’s a beauty, a work of love by Colon who grew up listening to this classic radio show late at night, feeling delicious shivers of fright under the sheets.

It’s horror, it’s retro, as much fun as watching a good ‘ole B&W movie and it’s Ernie at his best!

If your comics bookstore doesn’t have it, show some blood trickling down from your mouth and tell ’em to get with it or be food.