Press tidbits of the week

“Dillies’ art evokes the work of an earlier poetic penman, George (Krazy Kat) Herriman, though with a trace more detailed elegance. (The book’s carnival scenes are particularly splendiferous.)”
Library Media Connection gives Rick Geary‘s Sacco & Vanzetti a starred review:
“If anyone can bring an eighty year story to life, Geary is the man for the job. He tells the story with aplomb and allows another generation of students to see this case.”
Also, Scribblers.us says:
“You come away from this slim, packed volume knowing all the basics of the Sacco & Vanzetti case and quite a lot more. He’s at home in the era—no corny ‘20s clichés in his art, just period suits and hairstyles—and in command of his subject: the art of celebrated killings.”
A pet site adopts Stargazing Dog:

“This book will hook your interest in an instant, make you more teary eyed than you’d ever admit, and leave you with a deeper respect for companion animals.”

Foundanimals.com

Comic Book Resources put Salvatore, vol.2 on the top of their ‘6 most criminally ignored’ books of 2011 saying: ‘Certainly there’s nothing quite like it being published right now.”

Chris Mautner, CBR

Midwest Book Review says of it:

“The absurdities mount in this wry, whimsical tale. Highly recommended.”

Kinky & Cosy #10 on NYTimes GN bestseller list + more press

Nix’ snarky Kinky & Cosy is #10 on this week’s New York Times Bestseller list for hardcover graphic novels!

And Robot 6 has this to say about the collection:

“Nix’s little rascals are bad kids in the Bart Simpson/Calvin/Shinchan mode, but the humor is more fearless.”

“Recommended. The cultural tension is beautifuilly written, and the story is told well in the small moments between Lee and Matt.”

Library Media Connection on the Story Of Lee.

The Portland Examiner covers Rick Geary’s successful appearance at Bridge City Comics last week.

Finally, Manga Maniac Cafe gives Stargazing Dog an A-.

News on Salvatore, Little Nothings and more.

Library Media Connection Recommends Salvatore vol.1.

Warren Peace, the comics blog review site, has this to say about Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Rick Geary’s “Treasury of Victorian/XXth Century Murder” books never fail to be fascinating and educational. There’s something about Geary’s grim, quiet presentation that brings the events to life without being sensationalistic, yet also seems kind of alien, with odd-looking people acting out terrible scenes that seem as foreign to us due to their inhumanity as their period garb and setting. And the goofy details that show up here and there make me smile; it seems like Geary is slipping a bit of humor into such a steadfastly dry relation of events.

Whether you’re interested in the details of history or just like to see good comics storytelling, this is a really good book, one that educates and fascinates, and kind of outrages, even when the events depicted are nearly a century old. That would be a remarkable accomplishment on its own, but when it’s just one example among many, you know you’re in the presence of great talent.”

Johanna Draper Carlson at Comics Worth Reading reviews Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“Trondheim’s comics differ from the usual online journal type in three significant ways, though:

  1. They’re watercolor, which make them feel more like “art”, less like something jotted on a napkin.
  2. Trondheim draws himself with a bird head, which makes events less about him, more universal.
  3. They’re about him going places and doing things. There’s lots of travel in these strips, providing unique viewpoints and plenty of attractive visual content.

Trondheim travels to many places I’d never think to go, so there’s a lot of enjoyment-by-proxy in these comics, wondering if I’d feel the same way or notice the same things if I visited. Probably not, given his somewhat crotchety attitude — which also makes the comics funny in a curmudgeonly way.

 It’s all gorgeous, in beautiful, subtle colors.”

Library Media Connection on Networked and Dungeon +more

“Recommended. Teens will devour the action, suspense, and drama. The illustrations are amazing and add to the thrill of this graphic novel.”

So says Library Media Connection of Networked. They also say of Dungeon, Twilight vol.3:

“The artwork is lively, exciting, and full of details.”

“The mix of comedy and drama is welcome and feels truer to life than books that are one or the other. The artwork may be simplified but detailed enough to give us a strong sense of time and place.”

ComicMix on Salvatore

reviews: Booklist on Geary, Mr. Easter, The Broadcast, Miss Don’t Touch Me

Another rave for Geary’s latest The Terrible Axe-Man of New Orleans, this time from the influential Booklist:

“Geary’s archly antiquated drawing style is ideally suited for bringing bygone eras to vivid, convincing life. Geary’s exacting, historically accurate approach makes this—as well as his other nonfiction works—a natural for true-crime fans as well as comics lovers.”

About Brooke A. Allen’s A Home for Mr. Easter,  Library Media Connection, respected reviewer for Librarians says:

“Recommended. Brings a fresh look to the genre with dark humor and the realistic dreams of any young person struggling to fit in.”

Bill Sherman on Pop Culture Gadabout, as well as blogcritics, about The Broadcast:

“Imagine the original Night of the Living set in the Depression — and without any fleshing-eating ghouls – and you have a sense of what Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast (NBM) is about.”

A belated but yet timely review of Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.1 by Andrew Wheeler. Timely because it’s coming back to press next month along with the release of the new vol.2:

“So this is a French book — it has what counts as a happy ending, with the villains routed and their plans foiled, but it also has a deeper sense that some villains are never really routed, only pushed away, so that their next evil acts will be done somewhere else, to someone else. And that may be the best that we can hope for — that we know why our sister died, and did as much damage to the people responsible for that death as we could. It’s a fine, thoughtful, nuanced and unflinchingly clear-eyed book, not least interesting as a story deeply sympathetic to women.”