NBM October 2020 Releases

Here are upcoming titles, now being solicited in comic stores through Diamond Previews for an October 2020 release.

LEONARDO 2
Created by Stéphane Levallois

Planet Earth, engaged in an intergalactic conflict, owes its salvation to the clone of Leonardo da Vinci and to the rebirth of his genius. Author Stéphane Levallois has created the fantastic universes of many of the big Hollywood blockbusters (Alien, King Kong: Skull Island, Harry Potter and many others).

The result of two years of elaboration and work, this space opera exemplifies his talent in two areas that he masters to perfection: the universe of science fiction and art. To build his story and compose his boards, Levallois draws from the painted and drawn work of the Renaissance master, selecting a large number of drawings and paintings by Leonardo to represent the characters, vessels or even the architectures in his story.

The grand scale result is stupefying as Leonardo’s everlasting visions are successfully projected into a stunning futuristic setting. A visual experience not to be missed, in a large format hardcover.

10”x14”, 96pp., color HC, $29.99 US. HC ISBN 9781681122649. DIAMOND CODE: AUG201471; Pub Date: October 14th, 2020

PREVIEWS

 

AVAILABLE AGAIN

THE LOUVRE COLLECTION: ON THE ODD HOURS
Created by Eric Liberge


The highly successful series of graphic novels co-published with the Louvre museum in Paris (“Glacial Period”, “Museum Vaults”) continues with its next outstanding graphic novel. This time, the author invites us on a guided tour of the museum… by night… when the works of art come alive.

Our guide: a deaf night watchman who somehow manages to communicate with the souls of those ethereal and timeless works of art. A visual tour de force with a strong edge of the frighteningly fantastic.

61/2 x 9, 72 pages, full color trade paperback with flaps: $14.95 US ISBN: 9781561635771. DIAMOND CODE: AUG201473

THE LOUVRE COLLECTION: PHANTOMS OF THE LOUVRE
Created by Enki Bilal


Superstar European SF and Fantasy comics artist Enki Bilal revisits the Louvre in twenty-two portraits… He imagines 22 fates of men, women and children whose lives have been affected by a work of art. 22 portraits for 5000 years of creation.

They haunt the halls of the Louvre … they are long dead, often violently … they are a Roman legionary, a muse, a painter, a German officer … Each, one day, met a painter or a sculptor and was their model …

Bilal felt them, wandering the corridors of the Louvre, close to the work that tipped their life: Mona Lisa, the Victory of Samothrace, Christ reclining, an Egyptian mask …Bilal startlingly brings them back to life.

Both a work of Fantasy and a masterful homage, this was presented in a special exhibition in the Louvre in early 2013.

9 x 11 ½”, 144 pp., color Hardcover, $29.99 US, HC ISBN: 9781561638413; DIAMOND CODE: AUG201474

PREVIEWS

 

 The Louvre Collection: The Cross-Eyed Mutt
Created by Etienne Davodeau


Fabian is supervisor at the Louvre. He loves his job. He also loves Mathilde. When it comes time, she presents him to her family in their vast country house and not without some apprehension, as the Benion clan is a bit special.

There’s her father, Louis, who heads since 1975 the family furniture company founded in 1947, and two brothers, Maxime and Joseph. They’re not bad guys, just rather clumsy and with a decidedly unsubtle sense of humor. The fact that Fabian works in the Louvre is a welcome coincidence, since they just found in the attic a painting by an ancestor in the nineteenth century.

It’s a sorry representation of a cross-eyed mutt. What is the value? ask the Benion. Is this an eyesore or a masterpiece? Fabian, pretty embarrassed, punts on the question. So for the Benion, case closed, if it ain’t an eyesore then no doubt it has its place on the walls of the Louvre!

Fabian is left hoping the whole delusion will just go away, until one day the two brothers show up at the Louvre and ask. Getting the Cross-Eyed Mutt into the Louvre would demonstrate his commitment to becoming a member of the Benion family! Fabian is now in a pickle when he meets Mr. André Balouchi, an oddball frequent visitor of the museum who turns out to have quite a bit of clout…

A raucous satirical comedy that asks: Who decides what makes a work of art worthy of being in a major museum?

7 ½” x 10 ½,” 144pp., B&W hardcover, $24.99 USHC ISBN: 9781681120973; DIAMOND CODE: AUG201472

PREVIEWS

NBM June 2020 Releases

Here are upcoming titles, now being solicited in comics stores through Diamond Previews for an June 2020 release.


NEW

The Louvre Collection: THE RED MOTHER WITH CHILD
Created by Christian Lax


In Mali in Africa, a red Mother with Child, a 14th century African sculpture, is saved from the destructive madness of Islamists by Alou, a young honey hunter. In the company of other migrants, sisters and brothers of misfortune, Alou goes all out to reach Europe. His goal and his obsession: entrust the precious statuette to the Louvre Museum!

An epic adventure, touching upon the burning worldwide issue of refugees and immigration, in the ever-expanding Louvre collection commissioning graphic novels from leading world artists to spin tales around the famous museum.

9×12, 144pp, full color Hardcover, $27.99 US / $36.50 CAN; HC ISBN: 978168112257152799; DIAMOND CODE: APR201948


Pub Date: June 17th, 2020

PREVIEWS


AVAILABLE AGAIN

The Louvre Collection: ROHAN AT THE LOUVRE
Created By Hirohiko Araki

After Glacial Period and The Sky Over the Louvre comes another completely original story with stunning art by a leading mangaka, bestselling author of ‘JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure.’

Rohan, a young mangaka, meets a beautiful mysterious young woman with a dramatic story. Seeing him draw, she tells him of a cursed 200 year old painting using the blackest ink ever known from a 1000 year old tree the painter had brought down without approval from the Emperor who had him executed for doing so.

The painting meanwhile had been saved from destruction by a curator of the Louvre. Rohan forgets this story as he becomes famous but ten years later, visiting Paris, he takes the occasion to try and locate the painting. Little does he know how violently powerful the curse of it is until he has the museum unearth it from deep within its archival bowels

7 ¼” x 10 3/8” , 128pp. Full color Hardcover, US $19.99; HC ISBN: 978156163615051999; DIAMOND CODE: APR201950


PREVIEWS


The Louvre Collection: GUARDIANS OF THE LOUVRE
By Jiro Taniguchi

Acclaimed manga artist Jiro Taniguchi provides the latest entry in the Louvre collection of graphic novels.

After a group trip to Europe, a Japanese artist stops in Paris alone, intent on visiting the museums of the capital. But, bedridden in his hotel room with fever, he faces the absolute solitude of one suffering in a foreign land, deprived of any immediate or familiar recourse.

When the fever breaks somewhat, he sets out on his visit and promptly gets lost in the crowded halls of the Louvre. Very soon, he discovers many unsuspected facets to this world in a museum in a journey oscillating between feverish hallucination and reality, actually able to speak with famous painters from various periods of history, led to crossroads between human and personal history by… the Guardians of the Louvre.

8 ” x 11”, 136 pp. Full-color hardcover, $24.99 USHC ISBN: 97816811203485249952499; DIAMOND CODE: APR201949


PREVIEWS

Save Now on NBM Titles: 20% OFF SALE

That’s right, now through October 30th, we’re offering 20% OFF all titles in stock at the NBM Online Store.

Experience some of the best graphic novels from across the world including:

Click here to and enter coupon code E20 in the coupon box when ordering. Promotion expires on 10/30.

(Free Print Offer Not Included With This Sales Promotion).

Review Round-Up: BEAUTY, TWILIGHT: THE END OF DUNGEON & More!

DUNGEON: Twilight Vol. 4: High Septentrion & The End of Dungeon

 

 

“As usual, Dungeon is freaking awesome. It’s a story that you can jump into in the middle of and get a gander at what’s happening. You do not need to know any of the inside jokes. The characters are fun. Its non-stop action. What more can you ask for?”

Sequential Tart

“This graphic-novel series, originally satire, finishes as a rounded-out, stand-alone story that is more than the sum of its jokes. This volume is a strong recommendation to current fans, and the series represents a good next step for Adventure Time devotees looking for something equally snappy, but more adult.”

Foreword Reviews

BEAUTY

 

 

Beauty is rather long and took quite a while to finish but the reader will find it rewarding. Hubert explores the underlying tone of desire well with his writing and how beauty can be a curse sometimes.”

Parka Blogs

“It reveals of the human condition is a horror story in its own right…This cautionary tale by the French writer Hubert is illustrated by “Kerascoet,” a husband-and-wife team of French cartoonists. They employ a style reminiscent of Japanese woodblocks and other art from that country’s rich illustrative tradition. This retro style is perfectly suited to a fairy tale – nothing modern would have worked as well – while the Asian influence lends an exotic, timeless touch to Western eyes.”

The Comics Round Table

“This beautiful, full-color edition showcases the artistic talents of Kerascoët. The combination of simple yet expressive figures against lush, painterly backgrounds is an exquisite example of European comic making. Collected into one volume and translated from the French by Johnson, Hubert’s work takes the fairy-tale trope and removes from it all the cheesecake Disneyness, giving the cautionary tale back its edge and teeth. This engrossing, subtly feminist story will have adult readers wanting to examine the underbelly of other traditional fairy stories.”

Booklist

 

MISS DON’T TOUCH ME

 

 

“Kerascoet employs… a retro pen-and-ink that with a hint of impressionism – the prevailing art style of the time. The style is strong enough to cover the emotional range of the book, which is significant, and light-hearted enough to carry the reader through the painful parts.”

The Comics Round Table

PHANTOMS OF THE LOUVRE

 

 

“Phantoms of the Louvre is the ultimate mixed media project, as Bilal reinvents the history of 22 iconic works of art, tying them to a fictional muse or character whose story intersects with that of the painting/sculpture in some way. These phantoms, in turn, are depicted haunting the work, uniting art and story visually for the reader.

While Bilal’s artwork is striking, it’s the accompanying stories that sell Phantoms of the Louvre…A melange of art, history, and innovation, Phantoms of the Louvre is curious and unexpected.”

San Francisco Book Review

 

BETTY BLUES

 

 

“The art was a really rough fun sketch style that was very appealing…Enjoyable.”

Not Yet Read

Review Round-Up: THE LOUVRE COLLECTIONS, “beautiful work” and “gorgeous”

NBM’s ComicsLit imprint has been publishing the remarkable series of graphic novels commissioned by the Louvre calling upon different prominent artists to make up a story around the fabled museum. 

Here are some recent reviews:

Glacial Period by Nicolas De Crecy

 

“The author seems to be asking: what is art? Is there some art that is universally accepted and some culturally defined? Does art have any intrinsic value? There is some farce inside, the book does not take itself too seriously.”

San Francisco Book Review / Another Universe

“The book…fits together with the dreamlike logic and sense of the absurd de Crecy brings to everything he does. It’s preposterous, but feels right somehow.”

–  San Angelo Standard-Times

“While off to a slow start, this book ends on a fascinating, if absurd, note. The art has a nice amount of detail, combined with soft lines and colors.”

Sequential Tart

“Of the Louvre books NBM has published… this seemed to me to be the best, working perfectly well as a story in its own right while also being about the museum and the works it contains.”

Robot 6

 

Phantoms of The Louvre by Enki Bilal 

“Look, I could spend a lot of breath telling you how amazing this stuff is, but honestly: why? It’s Enki-friggin’-Bilal drawing and writing about the greatest museum on Earth! What the hell else do you want from comics? Unless your taste resides solely in your mouth, you need this like you need oxygen.”

Comics Waiting Room

“This would be a must for folks who are already fans of Enki Bilal, and…art lovers (will) appreciate some extra depth and meaning to works of art in an unusual way.”

Sequential Tart

“Now, some purists will resent a modern artist like Bilal using classic works as, essentially, his canvas. To which I say: Phooey. Bilal is doing what artists have always done, which is to stand on the shoulders of giants to push forward into the new and unknown. And when it results in beautiful work like this, I can’t entertain the argument.”

–  San Angelo Standard-Times

“It is gorgeous — in design, in recording select pieces of the Louvre’s collection, in Bilal’s super-imposition of ghosts upon them — and a supremely interesting springboard to watch a creator with Bilal’s imagination and abilities dive off of repeatedly.”

Robot 6

“Bilal’s art proves suitably unsettling: this is not a “touristy” consideration of fine art masterworks, but the work of a politically engaged artist. Each painting catches the feel of the original work while adding its own ironic spin, resulting in the most unique and thought-provoking “Louvre Edition” to date.”

Seattle Post Intelligencer

 

The Sky Over the Louvre by  Bernar Yslaire & Jean-Claude Carreire

“This is a strange tale that becomes stranger and stranger… This book is a wonderful resource for better appreciating the forces at play just as the Louvre was getting under way.”

Comics Grinder

NBM Review Round-Up!

Faster Than A Speeding Bullet: The Rise of the Graphic Novel


This book should be in the library of every comic book fan. It provides an excellent history, hitting the high (and view-changing) points. This book will help you speak knowledgably on the subject. Even if you’re not an avid comics fan and /or only like a small segment of things under the umbrella of “comics,” this history is interesting and insightful.

Sequential Tart

 

Lover’s Lane: The Hall-Mills Mystery

The book delves into the case and examines all the potential suspects, reading like a police procedural…Don’t be put off by this low-key presentation. The events, motives and individuals will leave you trying to solve this mystery.

The Joplin Globe

An Enchantment

More like a poem than a story…An Enchantment is an ambitious work and one worth checking out. It’s romantic, affecting, charming, fun, and utterly beautiful.

– Playback: STL

Durieux makes the Louvre a fantasy world, where anyone can be anyone else, and the artwork helps with the whimsical tone he’s going for – despite the old man’s age and fears, the book never becomes too dreary…It’s a charming comic, though, one that gets under your skin more than you might expect, and it’s a nice story of two people searching for something new. Whether they find it or not is for you to discover.

– Good Comics Blog at Comic Book Resources

An Enchantment delivers exactly what it promises in a sepia-toned dreamscape exploring the world of the Louvre. Worth a few reads to really absorb the entire work.

– Spandexless

 

The Lives of Sacco & Vanzetti

This was a very entertaining book, maybe my favourite of the series. It does a great job of evoking the era, outlining the issues involved and keeping it all a good read as well, and Geary’s art has been consistently excellent for decades.

– Four Realities

The Initiates

It’s a great story of two people who willingly decided to venture outside of their comfort zones and find out more about something they knew little about–and as a result, found more in common with each other than they thought possible. It’s an examination of how we are when we love something we’re dedicated to, and it’s engrossing in a way that invites you to just sit, relax, and take it all in after an exhausting day.

– Spandexless

 

 

 

The Critics Speak! Reviews of ROHAN AT THE LOUVRE Hit The Web!

The latest volume in our Louvre series, Rohan at the Louvre by Hirohiko Araki has been out for a bit now and we’ve gotten many fantastic mentions and reviews.

“Triggers bodily mayhem of a type sure to warm the hearts of old souls who remember the author’s early ’80s bio-mutation opus Baoh.”

–  The Comics Journal

“Looking like the work of a Japanese P. Craig Russell, Araki’s art lends a wistful mood to the tale’s proceedings and arrests the eye with willowy figures and expressive faces. Previous volumes of this graphic novel series published by the Louvre itself have all been excellent, and this is no exception.”

Publisher’s Weekly

“Rohan at the Louvre is less aimed at the bovine teenagers grazing the manga aisles at Barnes and Noble and more toward the sort of mature, comics-as-artform crowd…The sort of bizarre, distinct, and memorable one-shot manga that rarely ever sees the light of day over in North America”

Otaku USA Magazine

“A refreshing, visceral exploration of the concept of the artistic muse and the desperate lengths most of us will go to capture and hold onto inspiration.”

Broken Frontier

Rohan at the Louvre belongs on everyone’s shelf!  This book has rocketed to the top of my “Best of” list for the year.”

Stumptown Trade Review

“I found Rohan to be an engrossing and welcomed change of pace from the majority of my comics reading these days. Rohan is also a beautiful book.”

Gay League

“Araki’s striking color work is marvelously effective, adding another level to his artistry. While the color emphasizes the fantastic, Araki’s line and figure work tends toward the realistic, creating an interesting and engaging contrast. Araki’s illustrations are meant to be looked at and appreciated not just as part of the story but as art.”

Experiments in Manga

“Araki’s style is flamboyant and flashy, an interesting merger between traditional Japanese linework and American slickness.”

Comics Bulletin

Have you read Rohan At The Louvre yet? What are your thoughts?

Reactions to the Louvre book + some School Library Journal reviews

“In The Sky Over the Louvre, Carrière builds up a story that uses David as a framework around which to touch on both the history of the Louvre and the complicated political passions of the time. It’s Yslaire’s layout and drafting, though, that really makes the book sing. The players in this drama are all realized as emotive caricatures, and when the story fall silent on the grand sweeping splash pages there’s a chill as the world of late 18th century Paris suddenly becomes real. In this sense it’s very reminiscent of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s From Hell in the way that it draws out the texture of the time, from the scum choked gutters to the cramped apartments.

For the fan of dramatic history, The Sky Over the Louvre is not to be missed; a sweeping graphic album that captures the creative and destructive passions of the French Revolution.”

Bleeding Cool

“Not only is this the most unique format for a graphic novel it’s probably the most unique graphic novel I’ve read. 8/10”

Player Affinity

School Library Journal reviews a number of our books in a recent issue. On Boneyard vol.7:

“Will not disappoint fans of the series. Young teen boys will most likely enjoy the action, humor and the heroines’ fashion sense.”

On De Crecy’s Salvatore vol.1:

“Unusual, surreal and poignant story. Definitely intended for older teens and adults as evidenced by its mature language and themes.”

Little Nothings and On Odd Hours get reviewed

Trondheim’s Little Nothings keeps sweeping ’em up! ICv2:

“A solidly entertaining look at the life of an artist.  Fans of his other work may find this an interesting piece of slice of life graphic novels.”

From Comics Worth Reading:

“Reading each new volume of this series is like a vacation, traveling the world from the comfort of your home, and expanding your mind through vibrant observation and humor. The cartooning is impressive in its achievement, a wonderful journey through both subject matter and skill.”

Comics Waiting Room on Odd Hours didn’t much like the main character but does say:

“By tapping into the spirit of the pieces, ON THE ODD HOURS delivers an unforgettable visual tour of one of the worlds greatest museums.”

A few reviewers expressed dislike of the main character. Yeah, he’s burly but he’s also rebelling against a society that misunderstands deaf people…

On the Odd Hours reviewed

First of all, Booklist says of this new book out now in our Louvre collection:

“Virtuosically rendered by Liberge, who merges elegant clear-line
figuration, expressionistic pastel coloration, and in the odd-hours sequences, superimposition effects, Bastien’s story powerfully expresses the irrepressible life of great art.”

Comics Worth Reading adds, after a few reservations:

“Yet I was left impressed by how well comics worked to tell the story of a deaf man. Illustrated sign language is perfect for the format. It reinforces the lack of sound, making it something in itself, to exploit and manipulate, instead of a characteristic of the medium covered up by lettering effects. When his girlfriend argues with him, images spill around her as her hands gesture at him and captions explain what she’s communicating.”

After that, in this piece covering also our Joe & Azat and Year of Loving Dangerously, she is less kind on those.