The Critics Speak! Reviews of ROHAN AT THE LOUVRE Hit The Web!

The latest volume in our Louvre series, Rohan at the Louvre by Hirohiko Araki has been out for a bit now and we’ve gotten many fantastic mentions and reviews.

“Triggers bodily mayhem of a type sure to warm the hearts of old souls who remember the author’s early ’80s bio-mutation opus Baoh.”

–  The Comics Journal

“Looking like the work of a Japanese P. Craig Russell, Araki’s art lends a wistful mood to the tale’s proceedings and arrests the eye with willowy figures and expressive faces. Previous volumes of this graphic novel series published by the Louvre itself have all been excellent, and this is no exception.”

Publisher’s Weekly

“Rohan at the Louvre is less aimed at the bovine teenagers grazing the manga aisles at Barnes and Noble and more toward the sort of mature, comics-as-artform crowd…The sort of bizarre, distinct, and memorable one-shot manga that rarely ever sees the light of day over in North America”

Otaku USA Magazine

“A refreshing, visceral exploration of the concept of the artistic muse and the desperate lengths most of us will go to capture and hold onto inspiration.”

Broken Frontier

Rohan at the Louvre belongs on everyone’s shelf!  This book has rocketed to the top of my “Best of” list for the year.”

Stumptown Trade Review

“I found Rohan to be an engrossing and welcomed change of pace from the majority of my comics reading these days. Rohan is also a beautiful book.”

Gay League

“Araki’s striking color work is marvelously effective, adding another level to his artistry. While the color emphasizes the fantastic, Araki’s line and figure work tends toward the realistic, creating an interesting and engaging contrast. Araki’s illustrations are meant to be looked at and appreciated not just as part of the story but as art.”

Experiments in Manga

“Araki’s style is flamboyant and flashy, an interesting merger between traditional Japanese linework and American slickness.”

Comics Bulletin

Have you read Rohan At The Louvre yet? What are your thoughts?

Reactions to the Louvre book + some School Library Journal reviews

“In The Sky Over the Louvre, Carrière builds up a story that uses David as a framework around which to touch on both the history of the Louvre and the complicated political passions of the time. It’s Yslaire’s layout and drafting, though, that really makes the book sing. The players in this drama are all realized as emotive caricatures, and when the story fall silent on the grand sweeping splash pages there’s a chill as the world of late 18th century Paris suddenly becomes real. In this sense it’s very reminiscent of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s From Hell in the way that it draws out the texture of the time, from the scum choked gutters to the cramped apartments.

For the fan of dramatic history, The Sky Over the Louvre is not to be missed; a sweeping graphic album that captures the creative and destructive passions of the French Revolution.”

Bleeding Cool

“Not only is this the most unique format for a graphic novel it’s probably the most unique graphic novel I’ve read. 8/10”

Player Affinity

School Library Journal reviews a number of our books in a recent issue. On Boneyard vol.7:

“Will not disappoint fans of the series. Young teen boys will most likely enjoy the action, humor and the heroines’ fashion sense.”

On De Crecy’s Salvatore vol.1:

“Unusual, surreal and poignant story. Definitely intended for older teens and adults as evidenced by its mature language and themes.”

Little Nothings and On Odd Hours get reviewed

Trondheim’s Little Nothings keeps sweeping ’em up! ICv2:

“A solidly entertaining look at the life of an artist.  Fans of his other work may find this an interesting piece of slice of life graphic novels.”

From Comics Worth Reading:

“Reading each new volume of this series is like a vacation, traveling the world from the comfort of your home, and expanding your mind through vibrant observation and humor. The cartooning is impressive in its achievement, a wonderful journey through both subject matter and skill.”

Comics Waiting Room on Odd Hours didn’t much like the main character but does say:

“By tapping into the spirit of the pieces, ON THE ODD HOURS delivers an unforgettable visual tour of one of the worlds greatest museums.”

A few reviewers expressed dislike of the main character. Yeah, he’s burly but he’s also rebelling against a society that misunderstands deaf people…

On the Odd Hours reviewed

First of all, Booklist says of this new book out now in our Louvre collection:

“Virtuosically rendered by Liberge, who merges elegant clear-line
figuration, expressionistic pastel coloration, and in the odd-hours sequences, superimposition effects, Bastien’s story powerfully expresses the irrepressible life of great art.”

Comics Worth Reading adds, after a few reservations:

“Yet I was left impressed by how well comics worked to tell the story of a deaf man. Illustrated sign language is perfect for the format. It reinforces the lack of sound, making it something in itself, to exploit and manipulate, instead of a characteristic of the medium covered up by lettering effects. When his girlfriend argues with him, images spill around her as her hands gesture at him and captions explain what she’s communicating.”

After that, in this piece covering also our Joe & Azat and Year of Loving Dangerously, she is less kind on those.

NBM in February: a new Louvre book

Here’s what we’re soliciting for in comics stores now, coming in February:

The new book in the Louvre collection:
ON THE ODD HOURS
Eric Liberge
The highly successful series of graphic novels co-published with the Louvre museum in Paris (“Glacial Period”, “Museum Vaults”) continues with its next outstanding graphic novel. This time, the author invites us on a guided tour of the museum… by night… when the works of art come alive. Our guide: a deaf night watchman who somehow manages to communicate with the souls of those ethereal and timeless works of art. A visual tour de force with a strong edge of the frighteningly fantastic.
61/2 x 9, 72 pages, full color trade paperback with flaps: $14.95,
ISBN 978-1-56163-577-1

see previews

The 1st book in this series, Glacial Period is already in its 3rd printing and the 2nd, Museum Vaults, is sold out!

And from Eurotica (go to ‘coming up’):

SIZZLE #45
Peanut Butter vol.4 by Cornnell Clarke begins! And this issue continues best-selling series Kristina and Girl by Kevin Taylor, as well as Omaha the Cat Dancer and more goodies!
81/2 x 11, 64pp., B&W, magazine $5.95.

Voila! Put in your order now at your favorite comics shop!