Miami Herald and Publishers Weekly reviews

“Kerascoet depicts action and emotion beautifully and elegantly, with great feeling and boundless humor.”

Richard Pachter, The Miami Herald on Miss Don’t Touch Me 2.

“It’s an old setup done effectively and believably. If anything, the story feels too true to life as Hong Kong, Korea, China, and Japan all have no shortage of aimless 20-something foreign men, many of them making ends meet teaching English and enjoying the occasional tryst with a local girl. Wilson and Kutsuwada’s story tells such a tale from the girl’s perspective, faithfully reproducing real Hong Kong locales and name dropping a variety of cool bands along the way. The artwork, particularly the characters, is crisp and expressive, and the story faithfully reproduces a believable slice of life, despite the neat wrapup at the end, even if the story doesn’t dig that deeply.”

Publishers Weekly on The Story of Lee.

“Outrageous plot twists and offbeat characters”: Library Journal on Miss Don’t Touch Me; press roundup

“The plot fairly gallops in this naughty adult soap opera; snappy dialog keeps up the pace. Richly detailed full-color art offers both humor and pathos, creating engaging characters and a strong sense of place. [Those] who like outrageous plot twists and offbeat characters should enjoy this romp.”

The Library Journal on Miss Don’t Touch Me 2.

Salvatore by De Crecy elicits a fun Siskel & Ebert like exchange between two critics over at Manga Critic (just excerpting here):

“I think my strongest impression of Salvatore is that it makes me a little anxious, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Most of Joann Sfar’s work – Klezmer, The Rabbi’s Cat, Vampire Loves – and Taiyo Matsumoto’s comics – TekkonKinkreet and Gogo Monster – also have that effect. I suspect the anxiety partly comes from how visually dense de Crécy’s comics tend to be, sort of dragging your eye in a bunch of different directions at once, and how morally vague his characters and their situations are.

Almost every adjective I could come up with to describe the lines sounds very unflattering (e.g. “spidery,” “shaky”), but I actually find de Crécy’s work quite beautiful in its idiosyncracies.

I’m on the fence about Salvatore, in part because I find it a little over-scripted; de Crécy has a very strong urge to narrate, even though he’s a terrific visual storyteller. The scene in which the sow catapults down the snowy mountain, lands on top of a plane, then sails back down to Earth is just the sort of wordless (or largely wordless) sequence that I wish de Crécy did more of; it’s a gorgeous bit of visual choreography that nicely underscores what a space cadet Amandine really is.”

Manga Worth Reading, a part of Comics Worth Reading, has an exclusive preview of The Story of Lee. And Jazma Online has this interview of Sean, the writer.

“Delightfully audacious and risque”

“If you like fictional worlds you can really get lost in, you owe it to yourself to check out Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim’s Dungeon.”

Says Playback:stl on the occasion of Dungeon Monstres #3

Miss Don’t Touch Me gets a few raves:

“The art, much like in the first volume, is wonderful – a bit more refined and tighter, but still retaining a charming cartoony look to it. Kerascoët moves easily from the artful and artificial world of the Pompadour to the squalor of the streets to the hothouse environment of the upper crust, and the details are tremendous.”

Comic Book Resources in a review that is particularly insightful and well thought out. Definitely go read this one!

“Delightfully audacious and risqué sequel. A compelling saga full of secrets, this engagingly sophisticated confection from writer/colorist Hubert, illustrated with irrepressible panache by Kerascoet (artistic collaborators Marie Pommepuy and Sébastien Cosset) will further delight the wide variety of grown-up readers who made the first book such a popular and critical success.”

Now Read This!

Meanwhile on Salvatore by De Crecy:

“Thematically brilliant and visually stunning, De Crécy elevates the genre of funny animal comics far past general public perception. Self-deprecating, razor-sharp, and at times truly laugh-out-loud funny, Salvatore: Transports of Love is one of my favorite books offered by NBM in the last few months.

The funny thing about it is that if De Crécy chose to cast humans in the main roles, Salvatore wouldn’t work nearly so well. The story of a love-besotted, fondue-slurping hermit-mechanic, who builds the ultimate mode of transportation to drive, sail, and soar across the world to his beloved wouldn’t resonate the same way if the protagonist was Ben Stiller or Seth Rogen. The plot’s just too ludicrous. What better way to make the medicine go down than by couching it in an innocuous world of grotesquely cute talking animals?”

The Broken Frontier

Yowza, it’s raves like these that remind us what we toil for!

Story of Lee: Young Women Should Eat this One Up.

On Elephant Man by Greg Houston, while Robot 6 on CBR thought it “a bit too self-aware and a bit too in love with how “zany” it is,” Chris Mautner also went on to say: “Still, I’d be lying if I said I didn’t laugh several times and the plot is a lot tighter than [Vatican] Hustle‘s. For those who don’t get easily offended and don’t mind yet another collection of smart-ass jokes about superheroes, Elephant Man will suit you fine.”

The Story of Lee is a pretty strong outing. I am not sure about the crossover appeal, but young women should eat this one up.”

So says cxPulp. And there’s a great article on Sean, the writer of this, in Multiverse #1.

On Miss Don’t Touch Me Vol.2:
“There’s no real reason why a comic soap opera about a virgin dominatrix should be this good, but Hubert’s clever scripts and Kerascoet’s absolutely gorgeous artwork elevate the basic elements in very unexpected ways — a real treasure!”

Worcester Magazine who also reviews Salvatore 1, calling it “An alluring mix of subtle whimsy and over-the-top shenanigans.”

Newsarama on Miss Don’t Touch Me and a preview of Story of Lee

“Hubert’s good ear for dialogue and fast-moving scenes keep the pace quick, while each page gives readers nearly a dozen panels of information and characterization.  There’s no obvious genre hook here – it’s simply good writing, a story about a girl’s dream to find a better life and the unfortunate slings and stones that hold her back.  The character work is strong, the plot interesting and involved without being convoluted.

Kerascoët’s strong character designs and detailed artwork capture the atmosphere of early Twentieth Century France, from bustling Paris to idyllic pastoral settings. The character acting is superb, and the clear, simple grid layouts move the story forward precisely.

Miss Don’t Touch Me v. 2 stands out as worthy successor to the original, which was, in turn, among 2008’s best comics.  Hubert and Kerascoët have crafted an oddly funny, yet very dramatic period piece thriller, quite unlike anything else in comics today.  They’ve clearly established themselves as a creative team worth following to any project they pursue.”

Newsarama

Nice long preview to be seen at Playback:stl of The Story of Lee reaching stores very soon… or you can order now from us.

Booklist on De Crecy’s Salvatore and Miss Don’t Touch Me, School Lib. Jnl. on The Broadcast

“Hubert and Kerascoet tell this episode with artfulness and empathy that allow readers to appreciate Blanche’s dignity as well as her energy and creativity.”

Booklist on the new Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.2. And then…

“Eccentric” they say about De Crecy’s brand new Salvatore series, otherwise  dismissing the whole book as “the weird preoccupations of a French madman.” We couldn’t have asked for a better endorsement.


“I’d encourage English and Social Studies teachers to think about using it in the classroom, perhaps for a lesson on H.G. Wells, or daily life during the Great Depression.”

Says School Library Journal of the Broadcast.

Varied response on Miss Don’t Touch Me 2

I said it myself in the release for this book: after reading it, I was about to strangle Blanche for her block-headed naivete, this read can be frustrating.

So some are disappointed, some even hate it and some like the reviewer at Gutter Geek (on The Comics Journal site) explains why this second tome of Blanche’s adventures might be just as good:

“Many of the reviews I have seen of this installment have implied (or shouted) disappointment in the book, complaining of its irresolution, its ambivalence about all of its characters, including its purported heroine (who breaks the reader’s heart by proving not only all-too-human, but even less than human at the crucial moment),   In truth, I found this second volume of Miss Don’t Touch Me more satisfying precisely because it was less generic, less formulaic, less premised on plug-and-play characters.
If the first Miss Don’t Touch Me was clearly meant to be a one-shot, this second volume brings us deep into a world of early 20th-century Paris and into a cast of characters whose messy adventures promise no easy resolutions but many fascinating and troubling adventures in the years to come. If it turns out that we are left here (and I don’t want to give away too much by spelling out in any detail where it is, in fact, that we are left at book’s end) I will surely have reason to revise my impression of the volume. But assuming there are Miss Pas Touche volumes still to come, I am more than ready to accept the uncertainties of this strange and special album.”

What do you think?

reviews: Booklist on Geary, Mr. Easter, The Broadcast, Miss Don’t Touch Me

Another rave for Geary’s latest The Terrible Axe-Man of New Orleans, this time from the influential Booklist:

“Geary’s archly antiquated drawing style is ideally suited for bringing bygone eras to vivid, convincing life. Geary’s exacting, historically accurate approach makes this—as well as his other nonfiction works—a natural for true-crime fans as well as comics lovers.”

About Brooke A. Allen’s A Home for Mr. Easter,  Library Media Connection, respected reviewer for Librarians says:

“Recommended. Brings a fresh look to the genre with dark humor and the realistic dreams of any young person struggling to fit in.”

Bill Sherman on Pop Culture Gadabout, as well as blogcritics, about The Broadcast:

“Imagine the original Night of the Living set in the Depression — and without any fleshing-eating ghouls – and you have a sense of what Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast (NBM) is about.”

A belated but yet timely review of Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.1 by Andrew Wheeler. Timely because it’s coming back to press next month along with the release of the new vol.2:

“So this is a French book — it has what counts as a happy ending, with the villains routed and their plans foiled, but it also has a deeper sense that some villains are never really routed, only pushed away, so that their next evil acts will be done somewhere else, to someone else. And that may be the best that we can hope for — that we know why our sister died, and did as much damage to the people responsible for that death as we could. It’s a fine, thoughtful, nuanced and unflinchingly clear-eyed book, not least interesting as a story deeply sympathetic to women.”

NBM in October: Miss Don’t Touch Me is back!

Here’s what we’ve got coming in October and being solicited for now at your comic bookstore:

MISS DON’T TOUCH ME, Vol. 2
Hubert & Kerascoet
Blanche tries to leave the Pompadour, the high class house of call-girls, but their hooks are in deep. Nevertheless she encounters what could be her ticket out: a very handsome and very respectful young rich man, Antoine. She also reunites with her long-lost mother. It all seems rather idyllic but Antoine may be a little too respectful and how come her mother suddenly reappears?
61/2 x 9, 96pp., full color trade pb.: $14.99, ISBN 978-1-56163-592-4

See the previews.

Here’s what they said of the 1st one which is presently sold out, back to press for October as well:

“Would make a heck of a movie. Hubert’s writing is first-rate, Kerascoet’s storytelling and character designs are vibrant, and the overall look of the book is delightful. That’s why Miss Don’t Touch Me earns the full five out five Tonys.”
-Tony Isabella, Comics Buyers Guide
“A more orthodox piquancy infuses Miss Don’t Touch Me, a charming, Gallic twist on the murder mystery… and anything but prudish.” -Carlo Wolff, Boston Globe
“Call me twisted, but this book is, in fact, charming. Kerascoet moves the story forward breathlessly, and his disarming simplicity keeps “MIss Don’t Touch Me” feeling like a light-hearted bedroom farce when it could easily veer into into horror or soft-core porn.”
-Andrew “Capt. Comics” Smith, Scripps Howard News Service
Miss Don’t Touch Me is really nothing more than a murder mystery and period piece, but it sure is a good one—so good, in fact, that you may find yourself needing to be reminded how un-ambitious an unpretentious it actually is.”
Newsarama
A BOOKLIST TOP TEN GRAPHIC NOVEL 2009.

New From Eurotica:
The Diary of Molly Fredrickson:
PEANUT BUTTER, Vol. 4
Cornnell CLARKE
Molly’s back in San Diego studying, falling into amazing orgies with the basketball team for one, including some seriously hot women but boy is she missing her hot latina bff Erica… Clarke’s fully painted art just keeps improving to amazing new levels!
81/2 x 11, 48pp., full color trade pb.: $11.99, ISBN 978-1-56163-595-5

See previews in Coming Up in Eurotica.

——————————————————————————–

Meanwhile, over at Papercutz, the Hardy Boys have an all-new look and new great writer, Gerry Conway:

THE HARDY BOYS THE NEW CASE FILES #1 “Crawling with Zombies”
By Gerry Conway
Paulo Henrique, artist

In an all-new harder edged series and new format featuring legendary writer Gerry Conway! Frank and Joe go undercover as the Living Dead to infiltrate a “Zombie Crawl” that has acquired a notorious reputation for potentially deadly accidents. Will the Undercover Brothers and Agents of A.T.A.C. become the next victims? As if this weren’t enough – there’s something dark and sinister happening while everyone’s distracted by zombie madness! Could this be linked to the eerie events also occurring in River Heights, home of Nancy Drew?
6×9, 64pp., full color paperback: $6.99
ISBN: 978-1-59707-219-9

PLUS: a new Geronimo vol.6 and a boxed set of the 1st 3.

All available through your comics bookstore now! Or you can order the NBM books online here or all these books via our 800 886 1223 number (M-F 9-6 ET).