SPX Signings!

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T.J. Kirsch (Pride of The Decent Man) at SPX.
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Anais Depommier (Sartre) signs for a fan.
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Now Read THIS!

The stellar reviews keep coming in for PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN! Win Wiacek, writing from the UK on his NOW READ THIS blog, has proclaimed the book as a…

“thoughtful and totally immersive glimpse of a life both remarkable and inescapably pedestrian:a reflection on common humanity and day-to-day existence with all the lethal pitfalls they conceal and joys they promise.”

Wiacek also says adds that PRIDE is a “seductively sedate, powerfully evocative and poignantly human-scaled fable of a guy with no hope and the odds stacked against him from the get-go…”

To close out the piece, Win mention this as a great comic to hand to even a non-comics-fan, and a musical pairing suggestion was made – a recommendation to spin Bob Seger’s “Mainstreet” while reading the book. I’ll have to try that myself.

I’d also add another musical pairing – “Tender Years” by John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band, from the cult hit movie soundtrack Eddie & The Cruisers. There’s just the right amount of passion and nostalgia in that song to go along with Andrew’s story. Readers with a keen eye for detail will also notice Eddie Wilson’s iconic cut-off black shirt is the same one worn by Andrew Peters.

To read the review in full, go here.

For more about PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, including how to order, go to NBM Graphic Novels.

Thanks for reading!

-T.J.

 

 

 

 

PRIDE lives!

Copies of Pride Of The Decent Man are beginning to arrive in the hands of readers. This is feels like the end of something, but also the beginning of another stage – promotion!

It’s actually been two years (!) since sending off the initial short proposal for the book, and now it’s done, real, and ready to be (hopefully) enjoyed by the public.

I’ll be making my first two appearances in support of PRIDE soon at the Small Press Expo in Maryland and the Brooklyn Book Festival in NYC. Details to come very soon!

I’m also posting a new tour poster image I’ve got with some other dates as well. More are being added soon.

Pride Of The Decent Man is now available through many fine booksellers.

For more info, go here.

Thanks again – and thanks for reading.

T.J.

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We’ve Got It Covered

When working on the interior pages of Pride Of The Decent Man, I’d take a day or two and work on potential covers for the book. Here are a few alternates and rejected version of the book cover for PRIDE. ( you can click the images to see them at a larger size ). It’s always a nice change of pace to concentrate on single image after working on sequential pages for so long. I’d say some were more successful than others. There were elements taken from a few of these that made it onto the final design. There are things I like about each one, and definitely some things I could’ve done better. It’s a process, like anything else. It’s not wasted time, because in the back of my mind, I think – “this could end up being a good cover for a foreign translated edition!” If that were to happen, though, I’d end up wanting to redraw it anyway.

To find out more about Pride Of The Decent Man, including ordering info, go here.

Thanks for reading!

T.J.

On Lettering And Fonts.

When I was first putting together the initial proposal for PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, I thought about the lettering quite a bit. I hadn’t hand lettered a comic in quite a while ( my old lettering instructor Mike Chen at Kubert School is rolling his eyes ), and working digitally as I have been for 9+ years, I’ve seen what computer fonts work best with my particular style of artwork. Fonts that’ve worked for me in the past wouldn’t necessarily look best with this new story. It’s quieter, more contemplative than my previous books, and with that should come an appropriate font ( or fonts ).

I tried a few favorites from ComiCraft and Blambot I’d used over the years, but they didn’t look quite right for this project. They seemed to modern, too dynamic. I half-remembered one I’d used while working on an educational comic for UC Berkeley years ago. It was a font based on the hand lettering of Danish, NYC-based cartoonist Henrik Rehr, and designed by Johan Brandstedt. Henrik is a fantastic and prolific cartoonist, and his lettering is very organic and subtle on his many projects.

I thought it would work for the dialogue PRIDE, and I think it does! It’s also fairly close to a better version of my own lettering, if I were patient enough to try. Of course, it’s been years of not using that particular muscle. Luckily in this day and age, it’s very easy to reach out to fellow creators through social media or email, so I did just that. I asked permission to use the lettering font in my book and he agreed. I call that pretty lucky.

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For the captions from Andrew’s notebooks, I found a similarly organic-looking font designed by Font Diner that looks like someone’s handwriting. They also enthusiastically gave permission, as Henrik had, and I think what came out in the end works in support of the storytelling.

So please, seek out the work of Henrik Rehr as well as Font Diner if you can and support them. They’ve been good to me, and I can’t thank them enough.

For more information, including how to order, and preview pages for PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, go here!

Thanks again for reading.

T.J.

 

 

 

 

The Importance of Seeing It Through

I’ve illustrated only a few graphic novels. There are cartoonists that can produce an astonishing amount of pages every year. On the flipside there are cartoonists who take a decade to produce their magnum graphic novel opus. I’m not the fastest, but I’m also not the slowest. Speaking from experience, I’ll add that having a child can slow you down your productivity a bit. The most important thing to do when you’re working on a graphic novel is to simply finish it.

There was an interview in The Comics Journal years ago with Aaron Renier – I’m paraphrasing of course, but he was talking to a fellow cartoonist, the talented Craig Thompson. He was offering advice while Aaron struggled with his debut graphic novel, Spiral-Bound.

I can tell you from experience, It’s difficult, grueling and daunting. The sheer amount of work is overwhelming. Craig Thompson worked on many comics that he abandoned before finishing his breakthrough, Goodbye, Chunky Rice. He realized that the most important part is to finish things. You have to see it through. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. There may be weeks where you get nothing done, or days you lose because you realize the storytelling didn’t make sense. Even though you may like the drawing itself, you’ve gotta throw out the page and start over.

To have a finished book, to hold it in your hands – it’s like crossing that finish line. You, can’t get there, however, if you don’t stick with it. If you’re a flake, if you don’t commit to the work, you can never finish. You simply have to chug along, do the work. See it through.

To find out more about my new book, PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, including how to order a copy, go here.

 

Revisiting Older Work

It’s a common occurrence for illustrators to be uninspired. Some call it Artist’s Block, some refer to it as a rut. These are all describing a similar situation. From experience, I can tell you it’s not fun.

I’ve gone for extended periods thinking what little work I’ve created is terrible, and well beneath the standards I’ve set.

Comparing your work to others’ is something that only makes it worse. “I’ll never be as good as _______!”

There’s one thing I’ve found that can provide quite a boost in self esteem, and that’s revisiting and re-creating old artwork.

Surely I’m better than my 20-year-old self at this point.

Every once in a while, I’ve been taking old pieces of mine from my art school days ( give or take a few years ), and redrawing them. I have a folder on my desktop computer with older files I like to revisit, and it’s not difficult to find awkward art that could benefit from some tweaking. It’s great for self-esteem, and generally a lot of fun. It’s my favorite way to break out of any kind of funk or drawing rut.

Here are a few examples…

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Thanks for reading!

To find out more about my upcoming graphic novel, PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, go here.