Etienne Davodeau’s LULU ANEW, “Skillfully Unsentimental”

lulu

In Etienne Davodeau’s Lulu Anew, the main character Lulu goes on a journey of self-discovery, abandoning her husband and children for no other reason than getting away from the grind and being taken for granted with no other plan than savoring it.

Here’s what some critics are saying about the book:

“Skillfully unsentimental characterizations, light and earthy watercolors, and everyday goings-on reveal a familiar recognizable world, but Davodeau merges these elements into an enchanting realism…Davodeau’s brilliance is connecting it all into a deeply affecting story about how we seek to change our lives.”

Publisher’s Weekly Starred Review

“From the start, Lulu Anew has the potential to become too maudlin or too sanguine, but it grounds itself by making Lulu’s experiences humble and non-dramatic.”

Forces of Geek

“French writer Davodeau illustrates a beautiful narrative, with large, colorful panels that are like individual works of art.”

Library Journal Starred Review

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Review Round-up: Hubert & Kerascoet’s BEAUTY, “A spectacle of comics achievement”

 

From Hubert & Kerascoet, the team behind Miss Don’t Touch Me, comes Beauty, an engrossing tale for grown-ups on the nature of beauty, both fascinating and corrupting.

When Coddie unintentionally delivers a fairy from a spell that held her prisoner, she does not realize how poisoned the wish is she gets in return. From repulsive and stinking of fish she becomes perceived as magnetically beautiful, which does not help her in her village. A young local lord saves her but soon it becomes apparent her destiny may be far greater…

Here’s what people are saying…

“Beautifully illustrated with Kerascoët’s magical, dreamy, richly coloured art, Beauty is set to be one of 2014’s comic highlights.”

Publisher’s Weekly

“Kerascoet’s work on this book is a spectacle of comics achievement I’m betting I will not see again for a long time.”

Coverless Reviews

“Kerascoët and writer/colorist Hubert deliver an epic, if cynical, graphic novel meditating on the pettiness of human (and fairy) nature, and how lust and jealousy make the world go round.”

Robot 6

And a review for their previous book, Miss Don’t Touch Me.

“Set in the Paris of the 1930s, alternating between the glitzy and the very gritty, this dark and disturbing tale is both a fantastic noir and a tense exploration of various societal themes like class, inequality, political corruption, and most of all the staggering depravity of the elite. Inspired by racy classics like The Story of O, but somehow much more readable, this smart coming-of-age shocker is irresistible.”

– Publisher’s Weekly http://www.publishersweekly.com/images/star3.gif STARRED REVIEW

‘BETTY BLUES’ – “a powerhouse piece of work”

Our most recent release of Renaud Dilles’ work, Betty Blues, is garnering some very positive reviews.

The Quietus, in a rare interview, took some time to speak with Mr. Dilles about his work including Betty Blues, Abelard and Bubbles & Gondola.

Check out the interview HERE, and after the jump read what some of the critics are saying,

Continue reading “‘BETTY BLUES’ – “a powerhouse piece of work””

NBM Review Round-Up!

Faster Than A Speeding Bullet: The Rise of the Graphic Novel


This book should be in the library of every comic book fan. It provides an excellent history, hitting the high (and view-changing) points. This book will help you speak knowledgably on the subject. Even if you’re not an avid comics fan and /or only like a small segment of things under the umbrella of “comics,” this history is interesting and insightful.

Sequential Tart

 

Lover’s Lane: The Hall-Mills Mystery

The book delves into the case and examines all the potential suspects, reading like a police procedural…Don’t be put off by this low-key presentation. The events, motives and individuals will leave you trying to solve this mystery.

The Joplin Globe

An Enchantment

More like a poem than a story…An Enchantment is an ambitious work and one worth checking out. It’s romantic, affecting, charming, fun, and utterly beautiful.

– Playback: STL

Durieux makes the Louvre a fantasy world, where anyone can be anyone else, and the artwork helps with the whimsical tone he’s going for – despite the old man’s age and fears, the book never becomes too dreary…It’s a charming comic, though, one that gets under your skin more than you might expect, and it’s a nice story of two people searching for something new. Whether they find it or not is for you to discover.

– Good Comics Blog at Comic Book Resources

An Enchantment delivers exactly what it promises in a sepia-toned dreamscape exploring the world of the Louvre. Worth a few reads to really absorb the entire work.

– Spandexless

 

The Lives of Sacco & Vanzetti

This was a very entertaining book, maybe my favourite of the series. It does a great job of evoking the era, outlining the issues involved and keeping it all a good read as well, and Geary’s art has been consistently excellent for decades.

– Four Realities

The Initiates

It’s a great story of two people who willingly decided to venture outside of their comfort zones and find out more about something they knew little about–and as a result, found more in common with each other than they thought possible. It’s an examination of how we are when we love something we’re dedicated to, and it’s engrossing in a way that invites you to just sit, relax, and take it all in after an exhausting day.

– Spandexless

 

 

 

“THE INITIATES is One of The Best Books About Wine I’ve Ever Read, Period.”

There’s a reason why we’re especially enthusiastic about our latest release, The Initiates: A Comic Artist And a Wine Artisan Exchange Jobs by Etienne Davodeau.

Page45.com sums it up rather succinctly;

“This is a fantastic work which illuminates just how similar the approach to being successful in any artistic field is, really. Yes, you need talent and an eye for your subject, yes you need hard work to produce the goods, but you also need passion.”

Hard work and passion truly are two of the cornerstones of creativity, but this book resonates even beyond that.

Our headline comes from a review from Jameson Fink, a name likely unfamiliar to comic readers, but wine connoisseurs know.  He is considered one of “The 9 Most Important Wine Bloggers in the US” and his site was a finalist for the 2012 “Best Overall Wine Blog.”

He recently reviewed The Initiates on his site and had this to say:

“The Initiates illustrates the rewards of remaining curious and thoughtful when it comes to your life’s work, and what you can learn from others by listening and observing. Sometimes it may involve pruning shears and a vine; other times, a pen and paper. For anyone looking  to break out of their personal and professional comfort zone, The Initiates is a well-illustrated inspiration.”

 

 

Review Round-Ups: Here’s What The Critics Are Saying…

Image from Bubbles & Gondola by Renaud Dillies

“The timing of this book couldn’t be better, speaking as it does to what the citizens of a well-off community value, and how they shirk social responsibility. The lesson is plain, yet sensitively and elegantly rendered.”

The AV Club on The Fairy Tales Of Oscar Wilde: The Happy Prince

 

“Wilde’s beloved allegory is beautifully and smartly adapted by master craftsman Russell…The tale of the lifeless boy and the faithful avian is conveyed sweetly and with great heart.”

The Miami Herald on The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde:The Happy Prince

 

“P. Craig Russell has taken an interesting approach to illustrating this tale: he includes all the text from Wilde and adds a visual element to enhance and compliment that text…It’s his classic and timeless art style that elevate and enhance this story so well. It’s worth noting that Russell does everything on this book: layout, design and lettering along with the art. A meticulous artist who doesn’t do anything without a reason.”

Comic Book Daily on The Fairy Tales Of Oscar Wilde: The Happy Prince

 

“I first read the prose in my late teens and it’s stayed in my heart ever since. Here P. Craig Russell has done wonders with the work, his fine, clean line lit with lambent colours. I even love what he’s done with the speech bubbles linked to their square-boxed, qualifying commentary. More than anything, though, his art here is the ultimate essay in tenderness.”

Page45.com on The Fairy Tales Of Oscar Wilde: The Happy Prince

 

“The book is charming and sweet and well told. Gillies does very attractive comics, and his work can definitely be shared with kids who will probably appreciate this story.”

Comics Bulletin on Bubbles & Gondola

 

“Dilles’ engaging cartooning style is a bod to Krazy Kat, and he paces the book with a categorial whimsy that is simultaneously well-plotted and fanciful.”

Comic Buyer’s Guide on Bubbles & Gondola

 

“Despite the whimsical drawing and fanciful setting, one can’t help but feel that this is an intensely personal book for Dillies. This isn’t simply a book about writer’s block, but about a specific kind of aspiration and the blocks against that aspiration.”

High-Low on Bubbles & Gondola

 

“Despite focusing on two young girls, this is a very adult book. There are strips making jokes about the theory of relativity, adult toys, violence, and alcoholism. The twins’ mother’s sexual frustration and odd ways of coping with that frustration is a major storyline throughout the collection. The book derives a lot of its humor from the ridiculousness of seeing 8-year-olds make jokes about adult topics, such as the Neo-Nazi classmate who says the Holocaust never happened or when Kinky and Cosy have drinks in a bar with some aliens…The plotline involving the mother falling in love with the recycling bin, for example, was a bit too out there.”

No Flying No Tights on Kinky & Cosy

 

“A very bittersweet tale about love and how it fills our lives when it’s there and how we feel its absence…This is a book for pet lovers, the romantic, and anyone needing a pick-me-up.”

Portland Book Review on Stargazing Dog

 

“This melodramatic horror story should be popular with manga fans…The black-and-white drawings are bathed in pastel shades of pink, blue, and lavender, adding to the otherworldly tone of the story.”

School Library Journal on Rohan at the Louve

THE MIAMI HERALD Reviews THE INNER SANCTUM

The Miami Herald recently reviewed Ernie Colón’s The Inner Sanctum and shared the following thoughts on the book:

Billed as an adaptation of the classic radio show (with no other story credits), veteran editor and artist Colòn conducts a virtual art clinic here, showing his deep mastery of composition, design, figure drawing, expression, use of blacks and more in this collection of hoary guilty pleasures and cheap thrills. Throughout, his art is in service to the storytelling, creating clear narratives with tension and emotion. It’s nothing more (or less) than solid entertainment.

Not too shabby…