Now Read THIS!

The stellar reviews keep coming in for PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN! Win Wiacek, writing from the UK on his NOW READ THIS blog, has proclaimed the book as a…

“thoughtful and totally immersive glimpse of a life both remarkable and inescapably pedestrian:a reflection on common humanity and day-to-day existence with all the lethal pitfalls they conceal and joys they promise.”

Wiacek also says adds that PRIDE is a “seductively sedate, powerfully evocative and poignantly human-scaled fable of a guy with no hope and the odds stacked against him from the get-go…”

To close out the piece, Win mention this as a great comic to hand to even a non-comics-fan, and a musical pairing suggestion was made – a recommendation to spin Bob Seger’s “Mainstreet” while reading the book. I’ll have to try that myself.

I’d also add another musical pairing – “Tender Years” by John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band, from the cult hit movie soundtrack Eddie & The Cruisers. There’s just the right amount of passion and nostalgia in that song to go along with Andrew’s story. Readers with a keen eye for detail will also notice Eddie Wilson’s iconic cut-off black shirt is the same one worn by Andrew Peters.

To read the review in full, go here.

For more about PRIDE OF THE DECENT MAN, including how to order, go to NBM Graphic Novels.

Thanks for reading!

-T.J.

 

 

 

 

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The Reviews Are In!

Library Journal has given Pride Of The Decent Man a fantastic advance review on their site, calling it;

“A complex story told in a thoughtful, moving manner,” and “Highly recommended for anyone trying to be a better, decent person.”

They also describe the “Beautiful if often sad color drawings and spare dialogue” that fill the volume.

This review means a great deal, particularly because of its association with libraries, which can easily open up a new world of graphic novels to younger and new readers.

For those who aren’t aware of Library Journal, their site describes itself as “the most trusted and respected publication for the library community. Built on more than a century of quality journalism and reviews.”

Read the full review here.

To learn more about Pride Of The Decent Man, including how to order your own copy, go here.

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Review Round-Up: LULU ANEW, “A Thoughtful, Ultimately Hope-Filled Tale of Self-Discovery”

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From Etienne Davodeau, author of the acclaimed The Initiates, comes Lulu Anew.

“At the end of yet another unproductive job interview, Lulu, on a whim, takes off for the shore just to get away from it all. She’s got a husband and kids left bewildered but it’s nothing against them. This is just her time, getting away from the grind and being taken for granted with no other plan than savoring it. Surprised at her own temerity, she meets other people on the edge of the world. It wasn’t meant to be for long. It wasn’t meant to be anything but in the end, thrilling, fun, and possibly dangerous, this improvised experience will make of Lulu a different woman.”

 

Here’s what the critics are saying:

“This is a tale that can be related to by many people… I was instantly drawn to the mellow simplicity of it all.”

Bleeding Cool

“Etienne Davodeau’s art style is very relaxed and the colors are beautiful, making this journey a pleasure to see what is on each page. There is some mystery to the end of this tale, adding to the story.”

Sequential Tart

“Lulu is a specific character, but her adventure is a lens into the human condition…The artwork is rendered in the expressive, attractive Franco-Belgian style favored on the continent. The quiet competence of the artwork brings a stillness to the work, as if characters and readers alike are holding their breath in anticipation of … what?”

Captain Comics

“Davodeau’s depiction of one woman’s quiet, necessary rebellion taps into a universal theme of self-dissatisfaction that straddles the line between tale of survival and journey of self-discovery. And that is something we can all relate to.”

Broken Frontier

Review Round-Up: GIRL IN DIOR, “A Great Tale of Haute Couture and Whimsy”

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In Annie Goetzinger’s GIRL IN DIOR, “The Girl in Dior is Clara, a freshly hired chronicler, fan of fashion and our guide in the busy corridors of the brand new house of Christian Dior. It’s February 12, 1947 and the crème de la crème of Paris Haute Couture is flocking to the momentous event of Dior’s first show. In a flurry of corolla shaped skirts, the parade of models file down the runway. The audience is mesmerized: it’s a triumph! Carmel Snow of Harper’s Bazaar cries out: “It’s quite a revolution, your dresses have such a new look!“ Dior’s career is launched and Clara’s story begins. Soon, she is picked by Dior himself to be his model…”

 

Here’s what the critics are saying:

Girl in Dior is not a political work, it is a hymn to beauty, and – through Clara’s personal story – to optimism and endurance even when unexpected twists of destiny shatter our dreams.”

Irenebrination

 

“The latest telling of the Dior story comes in the form of a comic book, Girl In Dior…The familiar nipped waists and full skirts of Dior’s famous New Look silhouette are rendered in beautiful detail.”

Vogue

 

“The highlight of the book is the gorgeous renderings of the clothes…It’s the perfect present for anyone interested in costuming or fashion; better wrap it in plastic, because they’ll drool.”

Foreword Reviews

 

“The realistic illustrations are as glamorous as the world of haute couture; the colors are subdued, like faded photographs from the time…One need not be a fashion aficionado to appreciate this beautiful book.”

A Book’s Review

” Lush in its depictions and wittily captioned, the book acts as a dreamy portal into the height of couture.”

W Magazine

“The art is beautiful. The coloring looks like lightly dabbed watercolors and it makes the fashion and the dresses wonderful. Much like I’m sure Dior intended the clothing is the star here, not the models. What’s really wonderful is that Goetzinger includes the references for everything in the back of the book.”

Comic Bastards

“Blended with truth and a little imagination, Goetzinger draws a great tale of haute couture and whimsy.”

For The Love of Frock

” Just like with Dior’s work, the allure of this graphic novel is in the visuals, and Goetzinger draws the reader into the glamorous world of Dior’s Paris with her gentle but intricately detailed linework. Her clean line is perfect for realizing Dior’s sleek designs, and her characters model these ensembles for maximum dramatic impact.”

AV Club

“Goetzinger’s historical research is impeccable, but it’s her art, and, more specifically, the way she illustrates clothing, that makes Girl in Dior so impressive…The colors are rich and the linework is precise – clearly Goetzinger was dedicated to recreating Dior’s designs in a way that was accessible and interesting.”

Comics Alliance

“A most enlightening read.”

Comics Beat

“A fashionista’s delight.”

Herald Scotland

“Her art has a wonderfully classical style, cultured, refined, very tight, elegant, gorgeous.”

Forbidden Planet Blog

Girl in Dior is a beautiful view into the fashion world and would look on any coffee table as a glimpse into what could be. Highly recommended! ”

Sequential Tart

GIRL IN DIOR Reviews Arrive in Style

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Annie Goetzinger’s Girl in Dior is one of the most beautiful books of the year and it’s first English translation seems to be resonating well with critics.

“This is for fans of beauty and refinement, both in comics and in clothing, an indulgent present for those who love fashion and the female form…It’s lovely to see a subject often derisively dismissed as “feminine” being treated with such love and respect. A guilty pleasure? No guilt required!”

Publisher’s Weekly

“The book is stunningly beautiful. Goetzinger has a real talent for drawing clothing, using a delicate ink line and watercolor washes to give a sense of the weight, texture, and feel of the fabric. The dresses flow and swirl across the page as the models put them on and show them off; reading this is like having a front seat at a runway show…In the end, the marriage of form and function is perfect… Like the women within its pages, this is a book with both beauty and substance.”

Robot 6

“For someone who never gave a comic book a second glance, this little treasure has made me rethink the value of this type of reading material…The bottom line is simply this: if you are looking for an alternate way of reading about fashion then you better rush out and get yourself a copy. If you want a very insightful and historically accurate way of learning about this man and the world he inhabited, then get thee to Amazon or a book store if you can still find one. Lastly, if you want to get lost in fashion or introduce someone to fashion, this is surely a good way to do it.”

NY Journal of Books

“In sweeping tableaux and panels, she (Goetzinger) deftly captures the movement and drape of fabric with a line that’s a more sensual take on the traditional Franco-Belgian comics style of her contemporaries…In any language, it make readers nostalgic for the elegance and artistry of a bygone fashion scene.”

The Globe and Mail

“Goetzinger’s art and narrative cleverly weave a biography, delivered by a narrator whose naiveté rivals our own at the start of this book. Lovingly illustrated — and even more lovingly constructed — the narrative expresses the importance of Christian Dior and why he deserves to be well-remembered.”

Graphic Novel Reporter

“…A totally unpretentious comic, light and frothy. Yet it shows why Dior himself valued fashion. “In a time of machines,” he said, “couture is a final refuge for the human, the personal – and the incomparable.”

Mucha Creative

FAMILY TIES Review Round Up

Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s Shakespearean organized crime graphic novel, Family Ties, is their first work together since The Broadcast.  Here’s what the critics have to say.

Family Ties is a single volume graphic novel packed with tension and wrought with emotion, as well as more than a little violence. With all the hallmarks of the best mob movies, alongside the emotions of family dramas, Hobbs has crafted an engaging and original story.”

NJ.com

The best part about Family Ties, and the reason I’d recommend it, is the art, by Noel Tuazon, all black and white. And gray. Lots of gray. His figures and objects are mostly minimalist sketches, and the “coloring” is various shades of gray watercolor, which I, in my non-art history background, associate with traditional Chinese and Japanese nature paintings. Meaning that the story is just automatically moody and exotic-looking. But also, the black and white and gray formatting serves as a metaphor for the story morality: it’s not a world of black/white bad/good, but a whole bunch of people operating somewhere in the middle.”

Comics Bulletin

“A superb graphic novel that should appeal to students of Elizabethan drama and of grandiosely brutal gangster stories.”

Seattle Post Intelligencer

 

 

ALL STAR Knocks It Out Of The Park

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The reviews for Jesse Lonergan’s All Star are in!

“It’s an authentic tale of life in a small community, particularly in the wordless sequences of ball practice or late-night party. It’s a pleasure to get lost in the art.”

Comics Worth Reading

“Lonergan’s story hits all the right notes of smalltown life and athletic struggle, with loose, energetic, manga-inspired art.”

Publisher’s Weekly

All Star captures small-town adolescence perfectly (perhaps all too perfectly, depending on a reader’s mood and propensity for elegiac nostalgia), and is actually a great deal of fun, despite the down ending and the heavy melodrama.

Lonergan is a sensational character designer and cartoonist, and while all of the lines in all of the panels are dynamic and expressive, this is never more apparent than when he’s drawing the sports action, in which balls fly like meteors, and hit the ground, a glove or a bat with explosions.”

Robot 6

 

“Lonergan does get things right at every turn. His town feels right, the people who live there feel right, the reaction to what happens feels right, and the angst Carl feels over it feels right. There’s a universal recognition of the human condition here that works. Having grown up in a town like this, I saw the truth in it. The art has a crisp, cartoon-y look about it, and the ending, while feeling a little manufactured, resonates in the final panels. Solid stuff.”

Comics Wating Room

 

“Thoughtful, provocative, and populated by believable human characters, All Star is highly recommended. All Star does contain some cursing and a few sexual allusions, though it is never explicit, and is therefore more suitable for teens and adults (or any reader who is mature enough to understand what the Lewinsky scandal was all about).”

Midwest Book Review

 

This was so good. So damn good. I don’t care for baseball at all, but this isn’t necessarily about baseball. It’s about being someone who is willing to take a stand for what they think is important...”

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There are also two fantastic interviews with Lonergan at Comic Book Resources and San Angelo Times that are both excellent reads.

All Star is available now.