NBM Review Round-Up!

Here we are, back again, with some recent reviews of various NBM titles.

The Initiates: A Comic Artist And a Wine Artisan Exchange Jobs

“The excellent writing, characterizations, and tranquil-yet-stimulating vibe make this a treat to savor slowly, like wine. Davodeau’s smoky realism, though black-and-white, manages to suggest the full range of wine-growing climate shifts. Oenophiles will love this and the merely curious will be plenty satisfied.”

– Library Journal/School Library Journal

An Enchantment

“Durieux veils every panel with crepuscular sepia, which dulls the colors and contours of the featured paintings and installations but warmly enfolds the protagonists’ developing relationship. His drawing style is otherwise pure European comics realism, eschewing caricature and approaching the photographic, with, throughout, hints of the amusing, quicksilver line of . . . Cocteau”

Booklist

“Durieux’s fantasia peeps occasionally at these darker things: the legacy of dictatorship and history’s evils contained in the Louvre’s hallways and priceless works of art. This brooding subtext, however, is overridden by the artist’s sweet sense of mystery and magic, which has produced a beautiful lark of a story.”

Publisher’s Weekly

 

A Treasury of Victorian Murder Compendium

“A must-read for those who love comics and Gothic-tinged history…With heavy black ink on white paper, Geary draws impeccably drafted, brilliantly composed panels of stylized characters, gorgeous architecture, panoramic cityscapes and attention-grabbing close-ups. These pages are an artist’s master class. Geary’s cinematic style establishes visual rhythms that set the pace for a story that remains vibrant despite the fact that the only voice we read is the narrator’s. Beautiful.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer

Abelard

“A strange mix of bleak and cute.”

Grovel

“Wonderful, thoughtful, and moving.”

Sequential Tart

 

Philosophy – A Discovery in Comics

“A relatively quick read, especially for a book on philosophy, but it also makes philosophy approachable and less intimidating than it might be…A great overview.”

Portland Book Review

Salvatore Vol. 1: Transports of Love

“The leisurely pace, slightly skewed sense of humor, and young adult-that-looks-kid-friendly content might make the book a somewhat acquired taste, but, once you’ve acquired it, Salvatore is something of a feast.”

School Library Journal: Good Comics For Kids

 

Taxes, The Tea Party and Those Revolting Rebels

“Mack’s history is a vital and entertaining one. It captures Americans as radicals and wild cards and assures that rebellion is in our blood, even if it must be against each other.”

Archive 7

The joy of getting slightly creeped out.

 

Inner Sanctum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Library Journal says of Colon’s Inner Sanctum:

“Colón maintains the period settings and character interactions, while showing how ominous shading, gestures caught in frozen moments, staring yet lifeless eyes, and the confusion between reality and nightmarish deformity convert the tales from ear to page. Colón succeeds in respecting the original tales, his readers, and the joy of getting slightly creeped out.”

Another review on that book raves over his art but is less than sanguine about his writing: Broken Frontier.

 

 

This very same Broken Frontier (on another page), however, praises Salvatore 2 to the Gods:

“Nicolas De Crecy’s romantic comedy tour de force continues with witty aplomb and tongue firmly planted in cheek. Reading Salvatore is like reading a Shakespearean comedy, with De Crecy’s pointed commentary on the human condition coming in the form of clever double entendres, slapstick pratfalls, and calculated exaggeration.”

 

 

 

Stargazing Dog still keeps getting reactions. Modern Dog, a prominent magazine for dog lovers says:
“Anyone who’s ever loved a pet will be moved to tears by the tale of human misfortune and the unwavering dedication of dogs that unfolds  in Murakami’s graphic novel.”

And Chicago’s New City:
“Charming and universally appealing.”

“Female descendants of Max and Moritz”

“Here are the female descendants of Wilhelm Busch’s Max and Moritz. Like Busch’s awful boys, it’s impossible not to cheer these two through all their silliness and well-deserved comeuppances.”

Booklist on Kinky & Cosy.

From Robot 6:

Chris Mautner: “You know who’s great? Lewis Trondheim. Trondheim continues to reveal his life to readers on a weekly basis over at his Web site (and the NBM blog), most of which has been collected in his “Little Nothings” series. The lastest book, My Shadow in the Distance, offers more of the same, and such a wonderful same it is.”

Also on Little Nothings, this from Don McPherson at Eyeoncomics:

“This collection of one-page, slice-of-life cartoons are eminently relatable, and the universality of Trondheim’s ‘toons becomes even more apparent when one considers this book is a translation of work originally crafted and presented in French.”

Bookgasm on Ernie Colon’s new Inner Sanctum, says it’s fun if be it predictable…:

“Colón’s art, however, is a pleasure throughout.” —Rod Lott 

Also on Inner Sanctum from Comics Bulletin:

“This book is a hell of a lot of fun, an anthology of wonderfully drawn short tales, all of which amuse and delight and feature terrific artwork. And Ernie Colón’s storytelling chops are still a glory to behold.”

Paste Magazine on Bubbles & Gondola: “7.2. Full of small surprises, pleasurably mopey.”

Stargazing Dog still gets comments, this from Warren Peace:

“It’s really nice to see a book like this get release on American shores, aspiring to neither high artistic statements or in-your-face excitement, but still lodging itself firmly in the heart.”

The Cleveland Plain Dealer/Cleveland.com calls Salvatore 2 a ‘delightful follow up.”

Catp. Comics, Teacher Librarian and Unshelved on our books (and more)

Ernie Colon gets an excellent interview over at Comics Bulletin by Jason Sacks. And Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith over at Scripps Howard News Service has this to say about it:

“[Colon] can scare the pants off you. I highly recommend “Inner Sanctum,” which ought to come with a reinforced belt.”

Smith (same review) also has come around on Salvatore. Where he hated vol.1, now with volume 2:

“An Eventful Crossing” has changed my mind entirely. All the stories are progressing dramatically and are holding my interest, and what I interpreted as inane, random dialogue in the first book has transformed into solid (and funny) characterization. I was wrong to dismiss this book as an artist’s self-indulgence, and hope now to correct my error. “Salvatore” is initially hard to embrace, because it is a story that refuses to conform to expectation and classification. But it’s that very quality that’s making it a unique and entertaining read for me now.”

Gene Ambaum at Unshelved, a site beloved by Librarians, recommends Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:
“I read everything by Trondheim that’s available in English. But I would have picked this up for the cover alone.”

It is also reviewed at Playback:stl.

Comic Book Resources chooses Rohan at the Louvre as one of 12 to look forward to this year.

“Geary’s historical mysteries always sparkle with clarity, both in the artwork and plot.”

Joe Sutliff Sanders, Teacher Librarian on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti

Press tidbits of the week

“Dillies’ art evokes the work of an earlier poetic penman, George (Krazy Kat) Herriman, though with a trace more detailed elegance. (The book’s carnival scenes are particularly splendiferous.)”
Library Media Connection gives Rick Geary‘s Sacco & Vanzetti a starred review:
“If anyone can bring an eighty year story to life, Geary is the man for the job. He tells the story with aplomb and allows another generation of students to see this case.”
Also, Scribblers.us says:
“You come away from this slim, packed volume knowing all the basics of the Sacco & Vanzetti case and quite a lot more. He’s at home in the era—no corny ‘20s clichés in his art, just period suits and hairstyles—and in command of his subject: the art of celebrated killings.”
A pet site adopts Stargazing Dog:

“This book will hook your interest in an instant, make you more teary eyed than you’d ever admit, and leave you with a deeper respect for companion animals.”

Foundanimals.com

Comic Book Resources put Salvatore, vol.2 on the top of their ‘6 most criminally ignored’ books of 2011 saying: ‘Certainly there’s nothing quite like it being published right now.”

Chris Mautner, CBR

Midwest Book Review says of it:

“The absurdities mount in this wry, whimsical tale. Highly recommended.”

Pendleton Ward loves Dungeon, many top tens + lots more love

First an interesting factoid: the creator of the Cartoon Network’s Adventure Time show, Pendleton Ward cites Joann Sfar and Dungeon as a strong influence in this interview on USA Today’s Pop Candy column. 

Stargazing Dog is #3 on Panel Patter, #5 on Comics Worth Reading, on the best list of Kuriousity, and #1 on SFSite/Nexus Graphica

Catherine Dacey at Manga Critic had this to say of it:

“Perhaps the best compliment I can pay Murakami is to acknowledge just how much Stargazing Dog moved me. Not in a cheap, dog-in-peril sort of way, but in the same way that Vittorio de Sica’s Umberto D. touched me: as a beautiful meditation on the human-canine bond, one that acknowledges the complexity and inequality of that relationship, as well its enduring power. One of 2011′s best new manga.”

Pop Matters reviewed the Opera set we’re offering combining all of P. Craig Russell’s Opera adaptations:

“What Russell also manages to do with these works is to advance the narratives, offering a supremely dramatic graphic rendering, yet still enabling the ‘music’ to come through.”

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reviews the latest Salvatore:

 “Nicolas De Crecy offers a delightful follow-up to his graphic novel about a lovelorn, fondue-loving dog.” 

Comics Worth Reading chimes in on it:

“It is Salvatore’s journey into temptation when he picks up a hitchhiking beauty that carries this book along. Rich in character and filled with one remarkably strange moment after another, this one is well worth your time.”

Back to the top ten lists: The Onion’s AV Club puts Rick Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti as #8.

Comics Worth Reading put also Little Nothings 4 in a best 10.

Salvatore 2 hits comics stores Wednesday!

Volume 1 proved very popular and well reviewed. Now here comes volume 2 with the further eccentric adventures of Salvatore by De Crecy, hitting comics stores with good taste Wednesday.

Salvatore, vol.2
“An Eventful Crossing”
Nicholas De Crecy
The next chapter of this highly acclaimed off-the-wall nominated for an Eisner series that never ceases to astonish and amuse! Salvatore the crack dog mechanic has now finished his rig and is off to all the way out somewhere in Latin America to his sweetheart pooch he has been pining for. His trip which he takes with his reluctant assistant, a minuscule human who communicates only through his PC, goes all the way through Russia and the Bering Straits, a route he characterizes as epic but is really designed to avoid the seas which Salvatore is deadly afraid of. On the way, there are many temptations such as the pretty cat Julie who, as it turns out, has adopted the missing piglet Amandine the Sow has been so desperately spending her last penny trying to find while, unbeknownst to her, the rest of her litter is busy in a lucrative endeavor of bio recycling.
6
1/2 x 9, 112pp. full color trade pb, $14.99 ISBN 978-1-56163-613-6
see previews

Here’s one recommending it as the best of this Wednesday’s arrivals…

Just in, another:

“There’s really only one item of interest to me on this week’s ComicList, but it makes the trip to the local comic shop worthwhile. It’s the second volume of Nicolas de Crécy’s Salvatore, An Eventful Crossing, from NBM. Kate (The Manga Critic) Dacey and I discussed the first volume at some length and found it intriguing if a little bit unnerving. I’m looking forward to this one, even if it puts me a bit on edge in ways I can’t quite describe.”

Manga Curmudgeon. (and this ain’t even manga!)

News on Salvatore, Little Nothings and more.

Library Media Connection Recommends Salvatore vol.1.

Warren Peace, the comics blog review site, has this to say about Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Rick Geary’s “Treasury of Victorian/XXth Century Murder” books never fail to be fascinating and educational. There’s something about Geary’s grim, quiet presentation that brings the events to life without being sensationalistic, yet also seems kind of alien, with odd-looking people acting out terrible scenes that seem as foreign to us due to their inhumanity as their period garb and setting. And the goofy details that show up here and there make me smile; it seems like Geary is slipping a bit of humor into such a steadfastly dry relation of events.

Whether you’re interested in the details of history or just like to see good comics storytelling, this is a really good book, one that educates and fascinates, and kind of outrages, even when the events depicted are nearly a century old. That would be a remarkable accomplishment on its own, but when it’s just one example among many, you know you’re in the presence of great talent.”

Johanna Draper Carlson at Comics Worth Reading reviews Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“Trondheim’s comics differ from the usual online journal type in three significant ways, though:

  1. They’re watercolor, which make them feel more like “art”, less like something jotted on a napkin.
  2. Trondheim draws himself with a bird head, which makes events less about him, more universal.
  3. They’re about him going places and doing things. There’s lots of travel in these strips, providing unique viewpoints and plenty of attractive visual content.

Trondheim travels to many places I’d never think to go, so there’s a lot of enjoyment-by-proxy in these comics, wondering if I’d feel the same way or notice the same things if I visited. Probably not, given his somewhat crotchety attitude — which also makes the comics funny in a curmudgeonly way.

 It’s all gorgeous, in beautiful, subtle colors.”

NBM in October: The Return of Salvatore

Here’s what’s being solicited in comics stores as we speak, coming in October, the headline being De Crecy’s warmly received Salvatore series having its second volume:


Salvatore, vol.2
“An Eventful Crossing”
Nicholas De Crecy
The next chapter of this highly acclaimed off-the-wall nominated for an Eisner series that never ceases to astonish and amuse! Salvatore the crack dog mechanic has now finished his rig and is off to all the way out somewhere in Latin America to his sweetheart pooch he has been pining for. His trip which he takes with his reluctant assistant, a minuscule human who communicates only through his PC, goes all the way through Russia and the Bering Straits, a route he characterizes as epic but is really designed to avoid the seas which Salvatore is deadly afraid of. On the way, there are many temptations such as the pretty cat Julie who, as it turns out, has adopted the missing piglet Amandine the Sow has been so desperately spending her last penny trying to find while, unbeknownst to her, the rest of her litter is busy in a lucrative endeavor of bio recycling.
6
1/2 x 9, 112pp. full color trade pb, $14.99 ISBN 978-1-56163-613-6

What they said of volume 1:

“I love this book! Near-perfect. I can think of nothing better than another late night filled with pigs in overalls and bulls wearing AC/DC T-shirts. As soon as I can pre-order Vol. 2, I’m on it.”
-Whitney Matheson, USA Today ‘Pop Candy’

“Delightful.” –The Cleveland Plain Dealer
“Charming, amusing, and sometimes unsettling tale. From De Crecy’s always surprising mind. He is particularly gifted at creating a sense of action on the page.” –Publishers Weekly

“De Crecy’s loose, organic illustrations breathe life into his characters and give energy to his panel movement. [His] dry, witty humor combined with his endearing creatures makes a singular and worthy addition to comprehensive graphic novel collections.”
Library Journal Starred review
“The mix of comedy and drama is welcome and feels truer to life than books that are one or the other.” ComicMix
“Eccentric” Booklist

SEE PREVIEWS

 And New from Eurotica:

Peanut Butter, vol. 5
Cornnell Clarke
Molly gets to read her best friend Erica’s hot diary. Some of her experiences take a trip on the edge…
81/2x11, 48pp., full color trade pb, $11.99, 978-1-56163-617-4

SEE PREVIEWS AT EUROTICA

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COMING FROM our sister company PAPERCUTZ IN OCTOBER:

CLASSICS ILLUSTRATED DELUXE #7:
Around the World in 80 Days”
By Jules Verne writer
Aude Soleilhac, artist
Adapted by Loïc Dauvillier

Jules Verne’s adventure story about a wager to circumvent the globe in 80 days was so popular when it was first published that it spawned several real-life copycats who tried to replicate the adventures of Phileas Fogg and his valet Passepartout. Artist Aude Soleilhac’s vibrant and detailed work captures the numerous people and places encountered in Verne’s epic tale, which still manages to elicit wonder and excitement in readers more than 125 years after it was first published.
6 ½ x 9, 144pp., full-color paperback: $13.99
ISBN 978-1-59707-283-0
6 ½ x 9, 144pp., full-color hardcover: $17.99
ISBN 978-1-59707-284-7

DISNEY FAIRIES #7
“Tinker Bell the Perfect Fairy”
Paola Mulazzi, Augusto Machetto, Giulia Conti, writers Emilio Urbano, Elisabetta Melaranci, Andrea Greppi, Gianluca Barone, artists
Four fun-filled stories featuring Tinker Bell, Dulcie, Prilla, Vidia, and the rest of the Fairies of Pixie Hollow. Dulcie teaches her fairy friends not to take things for granted; a magic shell turns Tinker Bell purple; and for the first time in the DISNEY FAIRIES graphic novels, Peter Pan appears in Pixie Hollow! Plus: the return of Captain Hook and his bumbling pirate crew.
6 ½ x 9, 64pp., full-color paperback: $7.99
ISBN: 978-1-59707-281-6
Hardcover: $11.99
ISBN: 978-1-59707-282-3


GARFIELD & Co #4
“Caroling Capers”

By Jim Davis and Mark Evanier, writers
Ellipsanime/Dargaud Media, artists
Adapted by Cedric Michiels
Just in time for the Holidays, Garfield’s winter shenanigans! ‘Tis the season to be jolly and Garfield, always looking for an opportunity to stuff his face, goes caroling in the hopes that his neighbors will reward him with tasty holiday treats. There’s only one problem: Garfield can’t sing and therefore no one will give him a crumb! But Nermal and Odie are also out caroling, with greater success, and Garfield knows he has to find a way to get in on their goodies! Also featuring “King Nermal” and “The Amazing Flying Dog.”
6½ x 9, 32pp., full-color hardcover: $7.99
ISBN 978-1-59707-287-8

GERONIMO STILTON  #8 “Play it Again, Mozart!”
By Geronimo Stilton
Geronimo Stilton travels back in time to help the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who is the target of the Pirate Cats’ latest nefarious plan! The fiendish felines are in 18th Century Italy to steal musical scores by Mozart before he can perform at a historic concert. Will Geronimo and friends stop them in time? Or will the Pirate Cats change history forever?
6½  x 9, 56pp,. full-color hardcover: $9.99
ISBN 978-1-59707-276-2

Reactions to the Louvre book + some School Library Journal reviews

“In The Sky Over the Louvre, Carrière builds up a story that uses David as a framework around which to touch on both the history of the Louvre and the complicated political passions of the time. It’s Yslaire’s layout and drafting, though, that really makes the book sing. The players in this drama are all realized as emotive caricatures, and when the story fall silent on the grand sweeping splash pages there’s a chill as the world of late 18th century Paris suddenly becomes real. In this sense it’s very reminiscent of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s From Hell in the way that it draws out the texture of the time, from the scum choked gutters to the cramped apartments.

For the fan of dramatic history, The Sky Over the Louvre is not to be missed; a sweeping graphic album that captures the creative and destructive passions of the French Revolution.”

Bleeding Cool

“Not only is this the most unique format for a graphic novel it’s probably the most unique graphic novel I’ve read. 8/10”

Player Affinity

School Library Journal reviews a number of our books in a recent issue. On Boneyard vol.7:

“Will not disappoint fans of the series. Young teen boys will most likely enjoy the action, humor and the heroines’ fashion sense.”

On De Crecy’s Salvatore vol.1:

“Unusual, surreal and poignant story. Definitely intended for older teens and adults as evidenced by its mature language and themes.”