Holiday Pictures

My husband and I have returned from a wonderful two weeks in Oxford, England. We took part in the Oxford Experience, a summer school program based in Christ Church, one of Oxford’s most famous colleges.

The buildings are probably best known for the movies that were (partly) shot here, such as Brideshead Revisited, The Golden Compass and the first three Harry Potter movies. Especially the awesome sixteenth century staircase leading up to Hall is a great location, and I tried to catch some of its lines and dimensions in a drawing, which took me three sessions to complete! That’s probably the longest I’ve ever taken over a single drawing – and I even left out quite a lot of detail.

I don’t often make drawings like this, I’m more used to my cartoony style. But the Christ Church architecture just really caught me – and it’s a great excuse to sit in one place for an hour or so and take it all in. This is a view in Christ Church Cathedral, where I attended a great trumpet concert:

All throughout Christ Church there are bowler-hatted men and women to herd the tourists into their specified routes. They are ever friendly and impeccably dressed:

The first week, we attended a course about Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, which was written here. Our tutor was expert Edward Wakeling, collector, consultant, researcher, and writer on all things Carroll – not only a very knowledgeable man, but also immensely entertaining, full of riddles and jokes. I drew him as the Mad Hatter, with lots of references to the book and its writer:

The class consisted of a very international crowd – people from Australia, USA, Japan and Canada. After five days of total Alice-immersion, we were all inhabitants of Wonderland:

 

In the second week, we took part in the course ‘Human Memory and the Brain’, by neuroscientist prof. Gillie McNeill, who was as wise as she was enthusiastic. For another five days, we learned all about brain structure, history of brain studies, different types of memory and things you can do to keep your mind healthy (taking a course in the Oxford Experience was one of them). I made a whole bunch of cartoons during this class, which I will put up later – here’s a little preview:

At the end of our studies, we enjoyed a great formal Farewell – starting with drinks in the Cathedral Garden and ending with an amazing dinner in Hall, during which we received our certificates and heard some speeches about the Oxford Experiences and former Christ Church students (the college boasts twelve British prime ministers!). This is what we looked like in our snazzy outfits, against the centuries-old background:

 

Now it’s back to “normal” life, and anticipating the publication date of Science: a Discovery in Comics, which is not far off anymore…!

Science: the Middle Ages in 3 1/2 minutes (or 2 pages)

I love drawing timelines. It’s a real challenge to bring down certain periods of time down to their historic essentials in a way that’s entertaining as well as educational. In my new book Science: a Discovery in Comics, I included several spreads with illustrated timelines. In a previous blog post I already showed the one for the History of the Earth – another one, on pages 58-59 of the book, is the timeline for the scientific development during the Middle Ages.

In recent weeks I’ve been experimenting with animation program Sparkol, which makes it really easy to present drawings in so-called videoscribes. The Middle Ages looked like a perfect project to make into such a scribe – maybe it even works better this way than in its original comic form, since the animation allows me to pace the information and literally lead the reader’s eye.

I’m really curious what you think! Just click on the picture to watch a thousand years in a 3 1/2 minute nutshell on Youtube.

 

It’s Only Science!

It’s now less than two months to go before my book Science: a Discovery in Comics will be in stores! To whet your appetites, here’s a bit of a proto-science-comic I made for newspaper Trouw in 2009, for its philosophy section. Philosophy of Science has always been my interest, and here I had the opportunity to comment on the annoying habit of using scientific arguments to diminish the wondrous diversity of reality:

The kind of science I’m commenting on in this comic is actually science working in the old, “mechanical” paradigm – in modern science we see a shift towards a more holistic paradigm nowadays. If you want to know more about that, please read my book – you can already order it at Amazon!

Follow Science

Curious about the upcoming comic book Science: a Discovery in Comics? I made a Facebook page where you can follow its publication, reviews etc. Just click on the picture and then “like” the page.

 

If you’re on GoodReads, you will find a page for the book there as well. When the publication date approaches, I will certainly start a GiveAway there, where you can win signed copies of the book (there’s actually one going on now for the Dutch version, ending 19 June). Stars and reviews are highly appreciated!

Scientific contents

How do you structure a comic book that supposedly covers *all* of Science? Where do you start, and what line do you choose to make it into somewhat of a coherent narrative?

For Philosophy: a Discovery in Comics I chose the historical approach, and that’s what I’ve done for Science: a Discovery in Comics as well. Looking at things in their historic context makes it easier to see connections and understand how science, philosophy, politics, art and economics are all interconnected.

That said, taking this approach for Science still makes for a bit of a roller coaster ride – skipping ahead, rolling around, looping back, lingering at certain topics. Here’s the content page, so you see what a long and eclectic journey this book promises to be (in 192 pages!):

Contents of ‘Science: a Discovery in Comics’ – click to enlarge

 

Yes, it’s a lot – but don’t be daunted by the amount of topics, for me and my husband will guide you through:

This way, we hope to provide many opportunities to catch your breath, have a giggle or even a small insight. It’s a book you can easily read in smaller installments, or pick up every now and then to read up on a specific topic.

The book will be in stores in September, if you’re a shop you can order them now from NBM. If you’re not a shop, you can also pre-order at NBM, or at Amazon.

NBM in July: Science in comics and Omaha in her grand finale!

As being solicited for in this month’s Diamond Previews, the classic erotic comics series OMAHA THE CAT DANCER stars in her final bow, from our Eurotica/Amerotica imprint:

 Cat Dancer 8

The Complete OMAHA THE CAT DANCER, Vol. 8
Reed WALLER, Kate WORLEY & James VANCE
Omaha and Chuck struggle to put the tangled past behind them while political corruption and a tightening police investigation threaten to destroy their future and ensnare their loved ones. This volume contains the long-awaited conclusion to the internationally acclaimed sexy soap opera for adults, in which mysteries are solved, painful sacrifices are made and the lovely cat dancer takes a final turn on the stage. All-new and never before collected, Volume 8 was drawn by legendary Omaha creator Reed Waller and written by his beloved late co-creator Kate Worley, in collaboration with James Vance.
8 ½ x11, 160pp., B&W Trade pb., $15.99, ISBN 9781561637546

It has been years in waiting, and much anticipated as it is one of the seminal series that bridged underground with the new indie comics. We also have all previous 7 volumes, if you’re missing any, or a complete set of all 7 at a special price. Check it out on our Eurotica site, start with Coming Up.

Also this month, after her successful presentation of Philosophy last year which has gone back to press, Here’s Margreet de Heer’s fun intro to Science:

SCIENCE- A Discovery in Comics

SCIENCE- A Discovery in Comics
Margreet de Heer
Science: dull or hard to understand? Not if you read this book! The creators of ‘Philosophy – a Discovery in Comics’ take on a new challenge, and explain the different scientific disciplines in clear, colorful chapters.
Who exclaimed “Eureka” and why?
Why did Galileo get into a fight with the Church?
What happens when you have your DNA tested?
All these questions and more are answered in a chronological journey from ancient times to modern Quantum Theory, with creators Margreet and Yiri as your witty guides.
A great comic book for anyone who wants to learn in a fun way the bigger framework of science, or brush up on what they learned in school.
8×8, 192pp., full color hardcover, $19.99, ISBN 9781561637508

see her blog on this and more, and the book’s site.

 

Pentecost

It’s the Christian feast of Pentecost today – but what’s it all about? It celebrates “the descent of the Holy Spirit” on the disciples and other followers of Jesus, fifty days after Christ was seen to ascend to heaven.

But what is the Holy Spirit?

The Holy Spirit is often thought of as an inspirational force, an impulse to go out and create something, to pass something on. Together with God the Father and Jesus the Son it makes up the Holy Trinity.

Holy Trinity? But wait, isn’t Christianity supposed to be monotheistic – doesn’t it have only one true God, not three?

The early Christians solved this conundrum by declaring God the Father, Jesus the Son and the Holy Spirit three aspects of one God. So – there’s one True God, and He may manifest himself in either of these three ways. But He’s still the same One and you can’t really distinguish between the works of Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Confused? Well, that’s why it’s called mysticism. Maybe this comic I made illuminates it a bit:

 

 

(Note to all who may feel offended by my depiction of God: I chose to draw Him as an amoeba because that’s the beginning of all life, unformed but with the potential to take any form. Also, it’s what we ourselves are made from, and all life that surrounds us. Omnipresent, so to speak.)

 

The Scientific Method

This week, Science: a Discovery in Comics is going out to the printer in China! A memorable step, after months of translating and proofreading and finetuning. The physical book won’t be in stores until at least August, but for me the hard work is done.

To celebrate, here’s a page from the book. It explains the Scientific Method. In The Netherlands, I heard this page is popular with physics teachers, and a card is in the making that will be distributed in high schools.

If you’re a teacher (or even if you aren’t) please feel free to use this picture. Just remember there’s a lot more where it came from, which is my book Science: a Discovery in Comics, and it’s coming out this Summer.

The page concludes with the inevitable Aristotle, who also featured of course in my previous book Philosophy: a Discovery in Comics – he’s a pivotal figure in the history of science as well (and basically in the whole of the development of Western culture).

The Beginning and End of Science

The extra perk of preparing a book for publication at NBM is that I get to make endsheets, that go inside the hardcover at the beginning and the end of the book. For the upcoming Science: a Discovery in Comics I just finished making them – I layed out a grid and filled it with different pictures from the book, here’s a little preview of about a quarter of the total.

Part of endsheet of ‘Science: a Discovery in Comics’

Stuff

Here’s some info that needs posting, concerning present and future books.

To celebrate the second printing of Philosophy: a Discovery in Comics, I made another GiveAway on GoodReads.com. Now’s your chance to win a free, autographed copy of the first print! Click here to sign into GoodReads and enter the giveaway.

In the meantime, the newest book Science: a Discovery in Comics is almost ready to go to the printer! To start promotion, I made a page on my website detailing the contents of this book, with a lot of pictures and even a large spread about genetics. Click here to check it out!