More on the outrageous Elephant Man!

The latest on Greg Houston’s recent GN Elephant Man comes from Sequential Tart:

“As a broad parody of Superman, I thought this first issue was spot on. I thought the humor in Elephant Man was great, the writing is definitely the comic’s strongest asset. The over-the-top dialogue was outstanding, particularly the rants of Handsome Dirk. All the characters are ludicrously drawn and really matched well with the humor. My favorite side characters were the Big Hair Tough Girls.”

Grade: 7 out of 10.

The Gutter Geek blog at The Comics Journal says:

“In the end, the book is little more than an extended Kurtzman-and-Elder-era-Mad magazine spoof on superhero comics, but who needs more than that. And Houston’s line work, which crackles with just a little bit of genuine crazy on top of the rigorously enforced wackiness, is a frenetic and occasionally grotesque delight. Houston suggests on the cover that this might well be the first in a series. I suspect he is joking, but I will confess I am kind of hoping he means it.”

Rob Clough, elsewhere at The Comics Journal said:

“There isn’t much that’s subtle about Greg Houston’s new comic from NBM, Elephant Man #1, and I don’t think the artist would have it any other way.”

But he regretted that: “I would have preferred more time being spent on the oddities of Baltimore, like The Big Hair Tough Girls.  These ass-kicking donut shop workers are exactly the sort of thing Houston does best: a loving caricature of something ridiculous and unpleasant.  The Ralph Steadman/Bill Plympton/Mort Drucker qualities to his line remained in full effect, as the reader was rewarded on page after page with funny & gross drawings.  This is a comic to be looked at more than to be read, other than for conceptual context.”

Sequential Tart highly recommends Vatican Hustle

On Greg Houston‘s Vatican Hustle:

“The first comic in a long time to make me laugh in public. If you do not enjoy the non sequiturs of Family Guy, you will want to avoid this book. Everyone else is in for a treat of the lowbrow type. Vatican Hustle is one of those comics that you find yourself quoting amongst friends. The plot is so offensive that it quickly turns the corner and becomes funny once again. I highly recommend it. Grade: 9/10″

Sequential Tart

Sequential Tart on O

Sequential Tart has a very well researched review, brings up some interesting background.

“The story stands the test of time, partly because it is a catalogue of classic pornographic and Sadean tropes (Susan Sontag called The Story of O “meta-pornography”), but also because it has a purposely retro feel. Crepax gives the comic a flapper-era aesthetic that calls upon a timeless, iconic era of libertine feminism.

Crepax, who was a successful advertising illustrator, also knew the power of suggestion. While he does not shy away from explicit depictions of sex and BDSM activities, he also knows when to pull back and let comics do what they do best: allow the reader to imagine what happens between scenes, just outside the panel, in the next frame, or elsewhere on O’s body.
The true selling point of this edition of The Story of O is the production. Printed on a bright white, opaque stock, Crepax’s linework comes to life, with the flow of ink, the physical weight of the hand and turns of the wrist evident in every line.  The NBM edition of The Story of O is a solid, very reasonable priced standalone volume.”

Sequential Tart on Joe & Azat + the National Post

“The art of Joe and Azat is deceptively simple. Black and white images, mostly of faces and places, do an adept job of telling the story. On the surface it represents the simple way of life for the people of Turkmenistan. However, when you study the images in adjunct with the text, the complexity of this style becomes apparent. Longerman utilizes juxtaposition to explore perception and reality. People would like things to go one way, but the reality is that they must go another. For example, the Peace Corps administrators would like for Joe to follow the rules given to him for navigating Turkmenistan, but the reality is that he would never survive if he did.

If you like graphic novels with strong characterization and crisp art, determined to open your eyes and your heart, definitely grab a copy of Joe and Azat.”

Sequential Tart, giving it an 8 out of 10.

And one of Canada’s main papers, the National Post, picked up the piece on this book that ran in the Wall Street Journal.

Words for Big Kahn

More reviews for The Big Kahn:

“This story moves in unexpected directions in a quiet and real-feeling way. This is not a sensationalistic story that might appear on a cable network; instead, Kleid allows the characters sufficient time and space to move in their own interesting directions.”

Comics Bulletin

“Well written, well drawn, with characters you can understand and sympathize with. Grade: 8/10”

Sequential Tart

The Onion and Sequential Tart on Bringing Up Father

“The gags are funny and well-designed, with a freewheeling spirit that’s held up well over the past century.”

So says The Onion on Bringing Up Father, our Forever Nuts latest collection, out in stores now.

Sequential Tart also says of it:

“I began to appreciate the inventiveness of the comic, despite always following the same basic situation. Clashes between classes as a source of humor has always been around, and is still around today. That the strip was able to find endless variations of this impressed me.
The drawing of the comic also impressed me. It didn’t strike me immediately, but it is a sophisticated, well-drawn comic that obviously entertained folks for quite a long time. I was also was surprised by realizing that while Jiggs is the butt of the jokes of the strip, you really get the impression it is the high society that is the target…”