STAN MACK and MARGREET de HEER Conquer The East Coast!

 

From New York to Boston to New York, this weekend begins a marathon of appearances by Margreet de Heer, who’s new book, Science: A Discovery of Comics premiered as well as two appearances by the inimitable Stan Mack author of Taxes, The Tea Party and Those Revolting Rebels!

Sunday, September 22nd • THE BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL

10am-6pm  Brooklyn Borough Hall and Plaza 209 Joralemon Street, Brooklyn NY 11201

Visit NBM Publishing at Table 76 • Meet Margreet de Heer and Stan Mack

The Brooklyn Book Festival is the largest free literary event in New York City, presenting an array of national and international literary stars and emerging authors. One of America’s premier book festivals, this hip, smart diverse gathering attracts thousands of book lovers of all ages to enjoy authors and the festival’s lively literary marketplace.

 

Wednesday, September 25th • THE MILLION YEAR PICNIC

99 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Margreet de Heer book signing.

 

Friday, September 27th • BERGEN STREET COMICS

7pm • 470 Bergen St, Brooklyn, NY 11217

Bergen Street Comics closes out a September full of book release parties on Friday the 27th, at 7pm, with an appearance by acclaimed graphic novelists Margreet De Heer and Stan Mack!  It’ll be an evening of fun, with De Heer signing her new release Science: A Discovery in Comics, plus the previous release in the series, Philosophy: A Discovery in Comics, and Mack pitching in with his fantastic historical work Taxes, the Tea Party, and those Revolting Rebels: A History in Comics of the American Revolution.  Come have a drink on us and pick up some great books while you’re at it!

 

Saturday, September 28th • WARWICK CHILDREN’S BOOK FESTIVAL 2013

11am – 4pm • Park Avenue School, 10 Park Avenue, Warwick, New York 10990

The Warwick Children’s Book Festival’s goal is to celebrate literacy and creativity for children of all ages.  A fun-filled day for the whole family! Meet over 50 authors and illustrators.

Stan Mack will be appearing.

 

We hope to see you at one of these exciting events!

NBM Heads To MoCCA Arts Festival on April 6th – 7th

NBM is once again heading to the MoCCA Arts Festival and we’re happy to have Stan Mack (Taxes, the Tea Party, and Those Revolting Rebels) signing on Saturday following his 11:30 am panel, Art As Passion: Celebrating the spirit of comics through observation and reportage which will be moderated by Dan Nadel.

Also hanging out at the NBM booth will be cartoonist Lance Tooks making a rare U.S. appearance.  He’ll be signing copies of his series Lucifer’s Garden.

We’ll also have a special free sample of Persia Blues by Dara Naraghi and Brent Bowman as well as our latest titles including An Enchantment by Christian Durieux, The Initiates by Etienne Davodeau, and Abelard by Régis Hautière and Renaud Dillies.  We’ll also have plenty of Papercutz titles including Annoying Orange, The Smurfs, Ariol, Ninjago, Power Rangers, and more.

So come on by, meet some cool folks and celebrate comics!

NBM/Papercutz

Booths 161-162

NBM Review Round-Up!

Here we are, back again, with some recent reviews of various NBM titles.

The Initiates: A Comic Artist And a Wine Artisan Exchange Jobs

“The excellent writing, characterizations, and tranquil-yet-stimulating vibe make this a treat to savor slowly, like wine. Davodeau’s smoky realism, though black-and-white, manages to suggest the full range of wine-growing climate shifts. Oenophiles will love this and the merely curious will be plenty satisfied.”

– Library Journal/School Library Journal

An Enchantment

“Durieux veils every panel with crepuscular sepia, which dulls the colors and contours of the featured paintings and installations but warmly enfolds the protagonists’ developing relationship. His drawing style is otherwise pure European comics realism, eschewing caricature and approaching the photographic, with, throughout, hints of the amusing, quicksilver line of . . . Cocteau”

Booklist

“Durieux’s fantasia peeps occasionally at these darker things: the legacy of dictatorship and history’s evils contained in the Louvre’s hallways and priceless works of art. This brooding subtext, however, is overridden by the artist’s sweet sense of mystery and magic, which has produced a beautiful lark of a story.”

Publisher’s Weekly

 

A Treasury of Victorian Murder Compendium

“A must-read for those who love comics and Gothic-tinged history…With heavy black ink on white paper, Geary draws impeccably drafted, brilliantly composed panels of stylized characters, gorgeous architecture, panoramic cityscapes and attention-grabbing close-ups. These pages are an artist’s master class. Geary’s cinematic style establishes visual rhythms that set the pace for a story that remains vibrant despite the fact that the only voice we read is the narrator’s. Beautiful.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer

Abelard

“A strange mix of bleak and cute.”

Grovel

“Wonderful, thoughtful, and moving.”

Sequential Tart

 

Philosophy – A Discovery in Comics

“A relatively quick read, especially for a book on philosophy, but it also makes philosophy approachable and less intimidating than it might be…A great overview.”

Portland Book Review

Salvatore Vol. 1: Transports of Love

“The leisurely pace, slightly skewed sense of humor, and young adult-that-looks-kid-friendly content might make the book a somewhat acquired taste, but, once you’ve acquired it, Salvatore is something of a feast.”

School Library Journal: Good Comics For Kids

 

Taxes, The Tea Party and Those Revolting Rebels

“Mack’s history is a vital and entertaining one. It captures Americans as radicals and wild cards and assures that rebellion is in our blood, even if it must be against each other.”

Archive 7

NBM Review Round-Up!

We’re counting down the shopping days and we’ve had several of our titles show up in gift guides from The Comics Reporter and Forces of Geek, so we’re even more happy to share some great reviews that might also serve as holiday gift ideas.

Be sure to check out our site proper where you can order any of our titles.  After the jump, check out what reviewers are saying about several of our titles.

Continue reading “NBM Review Round-Up!”

The Functional Founders

There’s general agreement that today’s Congress is totally dysfunctional. Conservatives and Tea Partiers proclaim that, if we go back to the time of the Founding Fathers and adhere to the Constitution, life would be simpler and better for everyone. They want us to believe that, while the Founders disagreed, they were like an a cappella singing group, hitting different notes, but basically in harmony:

Hardly! As you’ll see in my book, Taxes, The Tea Party, and Those Revolting Rebels, there was at least as much discord then as now. The different sides held diametrically opposing views of what was good for this country. They were suspicious, calculating, devious, bull-headed, and hostile towards each other:

However, the conservatives are on the right track: For all their acrimony, the Founders were ready to get things done for the good of the country.

Eventually, scarred and battle weary, they produced a document solid enough to have carried us forward for over 200 years:

Imagine if today’s Congress were transported back to 1787 and were the ones responsible for producing the Constitution:

The Immigrants

Immigration is a loaded word today. It’s also a topic that plays a central role in “Taxes…” Obviously the early colonists were immigrants. They were seduced, bribed, or suckered into coming to the new world. Some were dragged here in chains, but most staggered ashore with a dream that somewhere in this new land they might find fortune, freedom, and a new start in life.

As soon as these newcomers got cleaned up and settled, threw away their old rags and put on new clothes, learned manners and thought of themselves as “the better sort,” they turned to the ships unloading the next arrivals and saw dirty, ignorant, inferior people fit only to be servants and laborers. And so it has gone for every new group that arrives on our shores.

Here’s an example from my graphic history, “The Story of the Jews.” It shows Eastern European Jews arriving at the turn of the last century. They’re viewed with embarrassment by the more cultured, educated, and prosperous German Jews who’d arrived looking just as bedraggled 50 years earlier.

England encouraged immigration because more workers in the colonies meant more profit for her, but the natural rights of her colonists were irrelevant. Gradually, England’s high-handed and insensitive taxes and regulations would fuel colonial discontent. But first I needed a page that would quickly describe the variety of immigrants who arrived here, and the usual distaste against newcomers by those who were here first.

For the rebellion against England to succeed, there would need to be an alliance between rich colonial merchants, who were seeing their profits shrink, and their discontented workers—but that will come a few pages later.

The Kick-off

Real life is comic, sad, ironic, extravagant; it moves fast and takes you by surprise. It’s ready made for my real life funnies comic strips. When I was roughing out “Taxes, the Tea Party, and those Revolting Rebels,” I struggled with how to kick off the story. History lies flat on the page. It doesn’t emote in front of you like real life does.

When it came to that crucial first page, I knew the facts I wanted to present, but how to do it in a way the modern reader would get. After gallons of coffee, an Out-Takes strip I did for Adweek magazine jumped into my head. The story took place at the end of the shooting of a TV commercial. I’ve included it here.

I thought, how classic, massaging the client…until the client walks out the door. Who hasn’t temporarily pasted a smile on his or her face and then been glad to pull it off? I translated that moment back in time to Colonial days and had my first page.