‘The Comics Journal’ Interviews Terry Nantier as NBM Celebrates Four Decades of Publishing

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Forty one years ago, Terry Nantier launched NBM Graphic Novels, and recently sat down with The Comics Journal to discuss the company’s influence and longevity in the industry.

From the start, Terry Nantier envisioned a company that would publish European and American graphic novels. The company was ahead of the curve from the start in many ways. In the 1980s they were publishing archival reprints of Terry and the Pirates and translating Corto Maltese. The company has published some of Europe’s great artists, including Trondheim and Larcenet, Blain and Kerascoet, Bilal and Revel. They’ve been publishing The Louvre collection, including this year’s The Cross Eyed Mutt by Davodeau. The company has published a lot of Americans over the years, perhaps most notably Rick Geary, but also some of the best work of P. Craig Russell, not to mention Ted Rall, Neil Kleid, Rob Vollmar and Pablo Callejo, and the debut of Brooke Allen.

For the complete interview, click HERE.

 

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Benjamin Melendez visits NBM

Earlier this week, Benjamin Melendez, the protagonist in the upcoming graphic novel “Ghetto Brother” visited NBM.

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Benjy is very excited that his life story is now going to reach a wide audience, telling the story of the Hoe Avenue Peace Meeting and how young people decided to go a non-violent path instead of seeking revenge and continuing the circle of violence.

Terry Nantier presented Benjy with an advance reading copy of the book. The official book presentation will take place in April during this year’s MoCCA Festival.

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SDCC 2013 Photos!

Reed Waller in his first Comic Con appearance in twenty years, singing OMAHA V. 8. According to publisher Terry Nantier, Reed brought in more selling original art during the con than NBM did!
Pulitzer Prize nominated cartoonist, the inimitable Ted Rall.
NBM Booth Helper Le’von Brown, Booth Manager Patrick Turner and Publisher Terry Nantier.
Booth manager Patrick Turner stands over Reed Waller and publisher Terry Nantier.
Booth helper Le’von Brown, Booth Manager Patrick Turner and Publisher Terry Nantier.

NBM at SPX: The Broadcast premieres.

The weekend following Labor Day is when the next SPX show happens in Bethesda, MD, in the Washington DC area. As every year, we’ll have our tables and a few of our artists appearing including a premiere!

Here’s who you can meet, at tables H7 and 8, Sept. 11 and 12:

ERIC HOBBS premiering The Broadcast which is just shipping as we speak! The buzz on this has been excellent, the book an engrossing noir thriller with the Orson Welles famous War of the Worlds broadcast as a backdrop.

BROOKE A. ALLEN signing her irresisitible A Home for Mr. Easter. Remember: we’ve got a Twitter contest going until the end of this month.

GREG HOUSTON signing his Elephant Man just out as well as Vatican Hustle. He’s a native Baltimorean, not from far away.

CORRECTION! TED RALL will not be able to make it.

And then this year, NBM publisher Terry Nantier will be there as well.

COME AND SAY HI, GET OUR LATEST!

San Diego: some pics

Some pictures from San Diego last week:

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The authors of Networked: Carabella on the Run which we premiered at the show, Gerard Jones and Mark Badger. Talking with Gerry is Sean Michael Wilson of Story of Lee.

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A wider view of our booth. Ted Rall and Richard Moore are signing. Moore had to call off coming because he was so sick but finally struggled in on Saturday. Also in the booth, Patrick Turner our booth manager, thanks to Patrick for a terrific job. Further behind is Deborah Pierce of Privacy Activism Organization on hand to help promote the new Networked book.

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And there’s our sister company Papercutz who had Papa Smurf going around the show to promote its new series of Smurfs graphic novels this fall. Here he’s posing with Terry Nantier, president of the company.

All in all, however, not a good show, we have to say. The aisles around the indie publishers were sparsely populated for too much of the show. The big budget movies are taking over the show and it felt like indie comics lovers have been turned off to coming. What a shame…