Win A Signed Copy of The Broadcast

So I have a few copies of The Broadcast laying around and thought I would give them away to a few luck readers over at Good Reads.

For those that aren’t aware, Good Reads is a social community like Facebook — but for readers. Members are able to talk with friends, participate in book clubs, trade books, interact with authors and much, much more. I’m new to the site, but I’ve already fallen in love. If you’re any kind of reader, the site is definitely worth a look.

Anyway, as I said, I’m giving away a signed copy of The Broadcast to three randomly chosen fans over there and all you have to do is let me know you’re interested. I’ve already had more than three hundred people enter, but everyone’s got an equal chance so the more the merrier.

If you’re already a Good Reads member all you have to do is click the “Enter to Win” link below…

 

Goodreads Book Giveaway

The Broadcast by Eric Hobbs

The Broadcast

by Eric Hobbs

Giveaway ends May 22, 2011.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to win

If not, I highly suggest giving the site a try. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed.

Broadcast gets AICN @$$ie

In the ‘don’t ask’ dept.: the site Aint It Cool News has given Eric Hobbs’  and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast an @$$ie Award for Best Graphic Novel complementing its “well-developed characters and a fascinating, even if long, read.”

Alright, just kidding about the ‘don’t ask.’ Always good to get an award, especially from such a popular site.

“An appealing cross-cultural love story.”

 
 
Story of Lee handles its appealing cross-cultural love story with a deft sweetness.”
Says Bill Sherman of Blogcritics, also on Seattle Post Intelligencer
Salvatore gets a “Highly recommended!” from Sequential Tart with a grade of 8/10.
And yet another review for The Broadcast from Rob Clough over at The Comics Journal. Interestingly, he went in the opposite direction of most. While he was not entirely bowled over by Eric Hobbs’ characterizations, he enthuses over artist Tuazon’s rendition:

“Tuazon’s scribbly, scratchy line is the book’s secret weapon.  He transforms what is otherwise a conventional narrative into a story viewed through a driving rainstorm or distorted sheet of glass.  Everyone is a little fuzzy and instinct, even as he has an uncanny way of providing just enough identifiers for the reader to quickly decode each scene and immediately understand what’s happening and who’s acting.  I’m usually not a huge fan of greyscaling, but Tuazon finds an ideal balance between light and dark.  Tuazon captures both the naturalism of the setting and its characters as well as the expressionistic nature of the human conflict.  In the hands of a lesser artist, The Broadcast might have been trite and too on-the-nose.  Thanks to Tuazon, it has a raw and visceral energy that raises the stakes for the reader.”

reactions to Story of Lee, Salvatore and The Broadcast

For Salvatore:

“This fun, heartfelt and blithe book is a joy to read and one of the best and most imaginative books NBM has published in recent years.”

Comics Waiting Room

“it’s a solidly entertaining, quiet story of possible love and family entanglements.”

Says Antick Musings of our brand new Story of Lee by Sean Michael Wison and Chie Kutsuwada. In stores now.

“A gripping and original story” says School Library Journal of The Broadcast, although it was less sanguine about the art which some get and some …don’t.

Booklist on De Crecy’s Salvatore and Miss Don’t Touch Me, School Lib. Jnl. on The Broadcast

“Hubert and Kerascoet tell this episode with artfulness and empathy that allow readers to appreciate Blanche’s dignity as well as her energy and creativity.”

Booklist on the new Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.2. And then…

“Eccentric” they say about De Crecy’s brand new Salvatore series, otherwise  dismissing the whole book as “the weird preoccupations of a French madman.” We couldn’t have asked for a better endorsement.


“I’d encourage English and Social Studies teachers to think about using it in the classroom, perhaps for a lesson on H.G. Wells, or daily life during the Great Depression.”

Says School Library Journal of the Broadcast.

Wilson interviewed in Japan, The Beat on Dungeon, GNR on Axe-Man: news & reviews this week

Graphic Novel Reporter on Geary’s The Terrible Axe-Man of New Orleans:

“Geary shows the same flair for pacing and drama here as he did in the other volumes in this series and in his nine-volume A Treasury of Victorian Murder series. He builds the tension by slowly revealing the facts, using a journalistic tone of voice that rarely dips into sensationalism. He allows his art to show the horrors of murder, with dramatic shadows, wide-angle shots, and close-ups all used to good effect. Geary’s black-and-white palette and line shading give the right historical feel to his tales, and he has a sharp eye for the details of a time period. That, combined with his historical research, makes his story all the more horrific as the reality of it is impossible to escape.”
Snow Wildsmith (gotta love that name)

Eric Hobbs of The Broadcast is interviewed on ‘My Friend Amy’s Blog.”

Heidi McDonald on The Beat says of Dungeon:

“A sprawling satirical fantasy about anthropomorphic warriors in a magical, ludicrous kingdom. It’s a darkly whimsical epic that’s a mash-up of D&D, Cerebus, Groo and any number of works by headliners Trondheim and Joann Sfar.

And she goes on to present a whole bunch of pages…

Sean Michael Wilson of our forthcoming The Story of Lee got a great piece in the English language Japan Times. A great way to find out more about him. He has quite a few GNs out this year, including AX:Alternative Manga which was chosen as a top GN of the year. He’s a Scot expat in Japan, now heavily steeped in manga… interesting story.

Oh, and an amusing quote of the week on Elephant Man from Now Read This:

“Warning: this book contains Six-foot talking flies and shaved, car-racing monkeys.”

Do we need to quote any other part of this review? 😀

Publishers Weekly on The Broadcast: “intriguing character study”

“Newcomer Hobbs works hard not to oversell the drama, focuing on the tensions withtin the group. Intriguing character study of different personalities under pressure. Tuazon’s art adds to the ominous mood.”

Publishers Weekly on The Broadcast.

News & views: Elephant Man in Booklist and The Broadcast nominated.

The Broadcast is nominated for Best Graphic Novel for Teens by the Young Adult  Library Services Association (YALSA). While this GN is not targeted at teens per se, it is good for all ages from teen up. We look forward to making the final cut.

Greg Houston‘s Elephant Man gets reviewed by Booklist:

“Superhero parodies don’t get any loopier than this. the story is carried by Houston’s skillfully exaggerated artwork, which deftly mines every bit of the tale’s grotesque humor.”

Raves for The Broadcast and Axe-Man

Eric Hobbs’ and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast picks up more reviews and interviews:

The Gutter Geek at The Comics Journal had this rave:

“Mature, original, and deeply thoughtful. Takes advantage of the unique affordances of the comics medium to tell a complex tale interweaving several sets of characters and individual dramas with minimal dialogue and remarkably little explication.

This is a script that was worked to death and then edited to the bone until it said the raftful of things it had to say without ever seeming to try. This is art that was similarly worked down to its fundamental essentials so that it comes to us as if still in the pencil rough stage even as every panel shows how much care and thought has gone into every line. This is good comics.”

And then Jared Gardner there, bless his soul, goes on to make us all mushy:

“The Broadcast is published by NBM as part of their “ComicsLit” series, which has brought us such significant books in recent years as Bluesman, Lewis Trondheim’s Little Nothings, and Rick Geary’s Treasury of  XXth Century Murder series. While not everything coming out of this series has measured up to the level of The Broadcast, everything they publish shows dedication and determination to do right by comics and their readers. Even as other publishers increasingly seem to be chasing after the movie deal, NBM seems to be putting editorial standards and a devotion to the form first. And so when I learned that The Broadcast was in fact attracting Hollywood attentions, I thought (contrary to my usual first response to such chatter), it couldn’t happen to a more deserving book or publisher.”

Broken Frontier has another interview of Eric.

And The Miami Herald, in a roundup of graphic novels before Halloween had this to say about Geary’s latest The Axe-Man of New Orleans:
“Consistenly excellent! If you missed any of the previous volumes in this great series, this is a good place to jump in.”