Ain’t It Cool News and more on The Broadcast

“The tension grows to a peak when a storm knocks out the power right in the middle of the radio broadcast. Paranoia and bedlam follow, but as Sartre said, “hell is other people,” not Martians.
The characters are well developed. You get a feeling of their pasts, without the use of too many flashbacks. There is plenty of mystery and suspense involved, which is slowly unraveled with remarkable pacing.
For some radio stations, it is a Halloween tradition to re-play Orson Welles’ WAR OF THE WORLDS broadcast. If a station near you doesn’t play it, try picking up this comic. It’s just as good.”

Ain’t It Cool News reviewing The Broadcast.

“Hobbs plays the high-concept straight and dramatic, and Noel Tuazon’s striking, slightly sketchy black-and-white artwork gives the endeavor a classy, literate look. It’s an elegant exploration of the idea that in every war—even those that aren’t real—the most powerful stories are the ones about how the big, historical, abstract events affect people.”

Says Las Vegas Weekly giving it: **** (4 stars)

LINK: Win a Signed Copy of THE BROADCAST

So it’s been almost a month — have you picked up a copy of THE BROADCAST? If not, now is the time. Reviews have been incredible  and the book is starting to disappear from shelves as word-of-mouth spreads.

Meanwhile, Johanna at Comics Worth Reading is giving away a signed copy of the book this week and winning it couldn’t be easier. All you have to do is visit her site, read this post and leave a comment describing your favorite Halloween costume. That’s it. It’s that easy.

Incidentally, if you aren’t a regular reader of Johanna’s site — you should be. It’s a great break from the typical PR machine that is comics news. I’ll be doing an interview with her later this week so keep your eyes open for that too.

more reviews of the week:

As usual, the writing is well-tooled and funny, with just the right touch of absurdity. The guest artists have a deft hand, though they don’t stray far from the usual Dungeon style. A good continuation of a worthwhile series.” 
Booklist on the latest Dungeon, Monstres vol.3

And here’s Newsarama on The Broadcast:

A taut thriller of betrayal and fear. Eric Hobbs does a fine job crafting a scenario ripe for paranoia and backstabbing.  Playing the characters off one another in various ways, he explores the bonds that tie them together and the fears that wedge them apart effectively.a slightly flawed, but promising step in the development of its creators, both of whom should merit watching in the future. “

My Interview With Graphic Novel Reporter

So I just finished up an interview with John Hogan over at GraphicNovelReporter.com.

I’m a pretty big fan of the GNR site so it’s nice to have an interview up on the main page. John’s intro is great, calling THE BROADCAST a “vividly entertaining and harrowing book” and he asked some really great questions. Perhaps most interestingly, he gave me a chance to re-examine some of the ideas I originally had for THE BROADCAST. Let’s just say that it could have been a VERY different book.

Two views on The Broadcast

“Hobbs’ brilliant, character-driven script weaves a tight psychological thriller that at once feels both intimate and epic. Although, on the surface, Tuazon’s raw, cartoony style may seem like a mismatch for Hobbs’ tight, sophisticated script, the contrast in artistic sensibilities only underscores the intense emotions lurking beneath the plot’s surface. Tuazon’s use of ink washes and inspired panel construction lends an air of atmospheric claustrophobia that truly helps the book achieve its distinct feeling of epic intimacy. Having experienced his art, it’s hard to imagine a “cleaner” artist achieving Tuazon’s depth of atmosphere and expressiveness within the confines of Hobbs’ plot.

A deceptively simple, exquisitely crafted OGN, The Broadcast is a tightly scripted, beautifully rendered self-contained tale, that doesn’t require prior knowledge of the characters and setting to be carried away by the story. Hobbs and Tuazon have realized in their efforts a shining example that sometimes less is more – even when there’s more lurking beneath the surface of the story than meets the eye.”

Broken Frontier

Not everyone agrees on Tuazon’s art, alas Booklist says:

“Writer Hobbs has a sure hand with characterization and adroitly sustains the suspense. Unfortunately, his story is not well served by Tuazon’s artwork. While his layouts propel the narrative effectively, the actual illustrations more resemble sketches than finished drawings and the lack of clarity often makes it difficult to distinguish between characters or follow the action, which diminishes the impact of what is otherwise a taut, socially conscious parable.”

One might get that first impression, but in fact, as Broken Frontier so expressively expains, Tuazon’s art, which may need some getting used to, fits, in that its very sketchiness adds to the confusion and immediacy, a little like a hand held camera on a running camera-man makes the experience all the more unsettling…

We agree to disagree, Booklist!

More opinions on Geary’s Axe-Man, The Broadcast, Networked

Tony Isabella loooves Geary’s latest The Axe-Man of New Orleans:

“He takes his readers back to that time, draws us into the fearful moments of the spree, and leaves us more than a little unsettled afterwards. THE FULL FIVE TONYS!”

in the Comics Buyers Guide. And here’s Sequential Tart piping in on it:

“To die for! If you’re a comics reader and a fan of the true crime genre, this book belongs on your shelf. Prepare to be horrified and amused when you add this graphic novel to your treasury of murder.”

“Well done!”

Says Comic Book Resources of The Broadcast. Sequential tart on this same book:

“Very compelling. Grade 7 out of 10.”

“If you’re a fan of techno-thrillers, you’ll enjoy this read. It’s refreshing to see a fast-paced adventure with some real ideas behind it.”

Comics Worth Reading about Networked.

reviews: Booklist on Geary, Mr. Easter, The Broadcast, Miss Don’t Touch Me

Another rave for Geary’s latest The Terrible Axe-Man of New Orleans, this time from the influential Booklist:

“Geary’s archly antiquated drawing style is ideally suited for bringing bygone eras to vivid, convincing life. Geary’s exacting, historically accurate approach makes this—as well as his other nonfiction works—a natural for true-crime fans as well as comics lovers.”

About Brooke A. Allen’s A Home for Mr. Easter,  Library Media Connection, respected reviewer for Librarians says:

“Recommended. Brings a fresh look to the genre with dark humor and the realistic dreams of any young person struggling to fit in.”

Bill Sherman on Pop Culture Gadabout, as well as blogcritics, about The Broadcast:

“Imagine the original Night of the Living set in the Depression — and without any fleshing-eating ghouls – and you have a sense of what Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast (NBM) is about.”

A belated but yet timely review of Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.1 by Andrew Wheeler. Timely because it’s coming back to press next month along with the release of the new vol.2:

“So this is a French book — it has what counts as a happy ending, with the villains routed and their plans foiled, but it also has a deeper sense that some villains are never really routed, only pushed away, so that their next evil acts will be done somewhere else, to someone else. And that may be the best that we can hope for — that we know why our sister died, and did as much damage to the people responsible for that death as we could. It’s a fine, thoughtful, nuanced and unflinchingly clear-eyed book, not least interesting as a story deeply sympathetic to women.”

Boneyard, The Broadcast and Axe-Man reviewed

“After 9 years, Richard Moore is bringing the Boneyard series to a conclusion, but you can still get in on the fun with volume 7. And don’t worry if you haven’t read the previous 6: it’s easy to catch on to the characters and the story in this volume is complete in itself.
It’s hilariously funny and constantly inventive: you really never know what’s going to happen when you turn the page. The main character, Michael Paris, is a regular guy who inherited a cemetery or “boneyard” from his grandfather. He was planning to sell the property but became attached to the inhabitants—which include an extremely shapely vampire named Abby, a demon named Glumph who has a thing for Star Trek, a hipster werewolf named Ralph, a talking raven named Edgar and a stogie-smoking skeleton named Sid.”
For The Broadcast by Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon:
“Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon transcend their rote milieu and create a genuine humdinger of a thriller.
It really is a nifty little what if scenario. One that is easily imaginable. Hobbs does a great bit of character set up before the broadcast starts and introduces the radio play in such a way that he barely even quotes it. It is a genius bit of writing.”
For the Axe-Man of New Orleans by Rick Geary, Rob Clough at the The Comics Journal:
“There’s a sense in which Rick Geary is the most accomplished horror artist working today.  It’s just that the horrors he chooses to delve into are real and all the more terrifying for it.  His  Murder Treasury series fascinates because of the way Geary is able to get at the heart of a particular time and place and figure out why a particular killing or killings so disturbed the equilibrium of a community.  Geary, in a style that is at once both restrained and visceral, creates a narrative that is genuinely disturbing in its lack of resolution.  The “Axe-Man” killings struck a nerve not just because of their seeming randomness, but because of the weird, lingering details of the crimes.
The juxtaposition between the party atmosphere of New Orleans and the creeping paranoia that the murders engendered was the initial pull of the story, but it was Geary’s focus on mundane details that ultimately contributed to The Axe-Man of New Orleans lingering uneasily in the imagination long after reading it.”

Wired on H.G. Wells (and THE BROADCAST)

Wired put a piece on their website today in honor of H.G. Wells birthday and we were mentioned.

It’s a nice little article, not only showcasing some of Wells’ most beloved work but the books, movies and television series that his work has influenced. While this isn’t a feature on our book by any means, it’s cool for me on a couple fronts. First, I’m a regular reader of Wired magazine, so being mentioned briefly on that site is pretty cool for me. And second, it’s nice to see THE BROADCAST listed alongside LOST and Jeff Lemire’s THE NOBODY. The writing of H.G. Wells may have influenced them, but those two works have been a huge influence on me.

Also of note, THE BROADCAST is now listed as “In Stock” on the Amazon website. Be sure to grab a copy the next time you’re making an order there. If you’ve already picked up a copy and enjoyed it — well, we would greatly appreciate it if you took a few minutes to stop by Amazon and give us a review.

The book hits comic shelves this week. I can’t wait to hear what everyone thinks.

A gush over A Home for Mr. Easter + more

Calling it “Thoroughly enjoyable entertainment”, School Library Journal in their latest issue goes on:

“The artwork is energetic with a rock-solid understanding of cartooning and kineticism … with an unusual protagonist and showcasing a quirky new voice in comics.”

…Rock-solid understanding… and Brooke is all of maybe 22, fresh out of college? Oh, yeah. And we agree! That’s why this book is awesome!

And Mr. Hornswoggler is back, this time on Elephant Man by Greg Houston:

“Every generation, and every art, needs wild men. If an art is lucky, it can get one every generation — but it can’t count on that. Comics, still an outsider form eighty years later, has more wild men than most — Fletcher Hanks, Bob Burden, Jim Woodring, Tony Millionaire, Marc Hansen — but that never means that there isn’t room for a new one.

Greg Houston is the newest wild man of comics, with plots that nearly out-odd Burden and art that rivals Basil Wolverton or Drew Friedman in its taste for grotesques.

His off-center inventiveness and gleeful squalor will appeal to those of us tired of the same old pretty punch-em-up types.”

“I haven’t gotten too far into Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s Broadcast yet, but I’m impressed with Tuazon’s loose style and the care with which Hobbs is setting up his story. The characters have all emerged as individuals with strong personalities, and good and evil are sharply delineated. Tuazon’s art is washy and atmospheric, and he does a great job of setting the scene, including small details such as a set table or a scarecrow on a rainy night.”

Says Brigid Alverson over at Robot 6.