Miami Herald on Geary: give credit to his writing also!

“It is the perfect book to enjoy on a quiet evening, preferably with a dog by your side. And chances are you’ll wind up taking your dog for a walk afterwards, pondering what you’ve just read as you gaze up at the starry sky above you.”

No Flying No Tights on Stargazing Dog

“With an artistic style recalling Herriman’s Krazy Kat and a fanciful imagination evoking St. Exupery’s simple, elegant flights of whimsy, Dillies takes his audience on a strange trip through Charlie’s fears and inadequacies. Billed as an all-ages book, the plot and narration are simple yet crafty, the real storytelling technique coming through in the visuals. Dillies’ transitions are particularly slick, as he moves between the real world of Charlie’s humdrum, lonely existence and the vast, dreamlike realms of his burgeoning imagination.”
Broken Frontier on Bubbles & Gondola

The Miami Herald on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Geary is almost universally praised for his stylish and crafty art, with extreme attention to detail and dead-on historical depiction of characters and settings. Sadly overlooked, however, is his writing. He’s often deadpan and hilarious but in the latest entry in his current series, A Treasury of XXth Century Murder, he masterfully organizes the story surrounding the infamous 1920 murder, subsequent trials and ongoing controversies into a highly readable and fascinating package. His art, as always, is ceaselessly expressive and charming, but let’s also give credit to this modern American master as one whose complete craft is at its peak.”

Cat Lovers on Stargazing Dog + more

Two cat lovers on this dog’s tale, The Stargazing Dog that is:

“I may be a cat person, but I am certainly not immune to the touching tale of a good-hearted and grateful dog who is faithful to his master until the very end. Poignant.”

Manga Bookshelf

“I was surprised, really, at how much I got sucked in by this book, especially because I’m a cat person. But the universality of Daddy and the dog’s tale works no matter who you are. Recommended.”

says Marc Mason at Comics Waiting Room.

And Playback:Stl makes a good point on Sacco & Vanzetti:

 “In this increasingly xenophobic and classist era, Geary does us all a service with this stylish reprise of their case.”

Kinky & Cosy, you either hate or love it:

“Now this is the kind of crazy crap I like to see in my comic strips. Arson, didlo jokes, cripple jokes, Fair Trade ripping, addressing the issue of violence in schools in an insensitive manner — all this and more is within the pages of Kinky and Cosy, from the Belgian comic strip from writer/artist, Nix. You’re pretty much going to have to toss all your self-righteousness out the window because if you don’t, you’ll just get offended and end up missing something that is cute, funny, and disturbing all rolled up into the form of two twin girls who get into their own brand of trouble.”

Comics Bulletin, giving it 4 bullets (it’ll take more than that to kill’em). The very same goes on to critique Bubbles & Gondola:

“This is an awfully charming book. Renaud Dillies is a wonderful artist, able to capture the intense and sweet fairy-tale life that Charlie the Mouse lives in, a world of bright colors, intense emotions and frustrating disappointments.”

Publishers Weekly starred review for Stargazing Dog + Teacher Librarian on Sacco

“Offers some profound insight on the human condition (by way of the canine condition) without being too sweet or sappy.”

Says Publishers Weekly of Stargazing Dog in a second starred review in just a few weeks for NBM’s graphic novels. The other recent one was for Bubbles & Gondola.

“We have been really zeroing in on absolutely the best GNs to  publish or we simply won’t bother,” says NBM Publisher Terry Nantier. “These two out of the park just show the results of our focus. If it’s from NBM, you simply can’t afford to miss it!” Stargazing Dog is already close to selling out of its 1st print run in just a few weeks.

“Were Vanzetti and Sacco murderers or victims of judicial prejudice?  Either way, their case definitely said something about the America they called home. Geary’s historical mysteries always sparkle with clarity, both in the artwork and plot, and in this book he also resists the urge to decide that one side was right, all while giving the reader the most up-to-date information possible.”

Teacher Librarian

“it is not often a graphic novel can bring me to tears”

2 reviews on Stargazing Dog:

“It’s not often a graphic novel can bring me to tears. “Stargazing Dog,” by Takashi Murakami, did just that.

There is something positive to take from this. I admit I found the first part so emotionally wrenching that it took me two weeks to force myself to read the second part. But afterward the story kept bubbling up in my thoughts, demanding that I think about it, learn something from it.

And as America suffers its own economic doldrums, “Stargazing Dog” has a lot to teach.”

Capt. Comics Andrew Smith of Scripps Howard News Service.

“It’s bittersweet, but I appreciated that it didn’t take the easy way out.  It’s hard to keep from finding yourself entranced by Happie [the dog] as he goes from good to bad situation but still has that upbeat canine spirit.”

says Read About Comics

“Lewis Trondheim is one of the greatest living cartoonists. It’s not even an argument. His work is immediately accessible, profoundly universal, and deeply hilarious. When he makes you laugh (and he will), it’s not just a sight-gag or well-observed human foible. It’s that you are so invested in his character and his world that it’s as if you are laughing at yourself, because in a way, you are. I can’t think of anyone in comics other than Charles Schulz who so brilliantly and intuitively understood human nature and conveyed it and depicted it as well as Trondheim does.”

Trouble with Comics on Little Nothings 4, still getting reviews months later and still a feature on this blog every Monday.

Speaking of  books still getting reviews, the panelists give another rave for Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti.

Booklist on Sacco & Vanzetti + more

“The quiet effectiveness of Geary’s consciously old-fashioned drawing style is reinforced by his thorough recreation of period details.”

Says Booklist of Geary‘s Sacco & Vanzetti.

“This dreamlike meditation on creativity and finding value in life is not understood so much as succumbed to. Reminded me of the work of Winsor McCay in its dreamlike logic.”

Johanna Draper Carlson, Comics Worth Reading on Bubbles & Gondola which is shipping now and wil be in stores by October 12th.

“Those reading these strips for shockingly frank autobiographical confessions are hereby advised to look elsewhere. For the rest of us, Trondheim’s ongoing Portrait of the Artist as a Middle-Aged Bird continues to charm and deliver.”
Bill Sherman of Blogcritics on Little Nothings 4.

“Indispensable” says The Onion on Geary + join CBR thread on Dungeon

“Indispensable”

Says The Onion AV Club on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti. And Jason Sacks of Comics Bulletin adds:

“If you know nothing about the trials of Sacco and Vanzetti, this book is a great introduction their story. If you know something about their trials, you should find this book a fascinating exploration of the case. And if you’ve never read anything by Geary, I think you’ll really enjoy the fascinating combination of objective reporting and personal artfulness that Rick Geary presents in this book.”

And on Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“I thought this was the best volume since the first. This one features a bit more anxiety (a health scare) and a lot more action (many overseas trips). There’s a delightful mix of fussiness and craziness in his depiction of crossing through Death Valley on a journey from Las Vegas to San Francisco.  What’s remarkable about the Little Nothings series is not its light tone and loose line; instead, it’s that Trondheim creates such a complex, rich, and visually exciting narrative environment for himself and his readers to explore.”

Rob Clough at The Comics Journal.

Publishers Weekly (need sub) has chosen our about-to-ship Bubbles & Gondola for its recommended list of “comics and graphic novels as gifts 2011”.

DUNGEON LOVERS!! Thanks to Taliesin for taking a jump and establishing a thread on CBR over the Dungeon series. Go over there and get in on the conversation if you’re a Dungeon lover. Keep him company! Encourage others to join in! Get the word out! We’re gettin’ tired of hearing how this is overlooked (the series sells well but should sell a lot better!)

SPX: Fabulous.

Just back from SPX in the Washington DC area and it was energizing!

Saturday was amazing, starting right off the bat in high gear. For a few hours, we sold steadily books upon books, selling out of many Dungeon titles quickly as well as Sky Over the Louvre and Geary’s new Sacco & Vanzetti.

By the end of the show we had sold out of substantial quantities also of our premiere of the Stargazing Dog which was warmly received and, with Brooke Allen signing, of the many copies we brought of her Home for Mr. Easter.

The energy around the show is wonderful to see, the Ignatz Awards were SRO with many unable to fit and the post party went on into the wee hours. Gotta say, I love the forgiving hours of the show, starting at 11 on Saturday and even noon on Sunday.

A fun experience worth the trip and this show should attract attendees from farther than the DC area alone, it deserves it!

Many thanks to Brooke, Rick Parker who held up the Papercutz side, and Jesse Lonergan for appearing at our booth and talking with fans.

News on Salvatore, Little Nothings and more.

Library Media Connection Recommends Salvatore vol.1.

Warren Peace, the comics blog review site, has this to say about Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Rick Geary’s “Treasury of Victorian/XXth Century Murder” books never fail to be fascinating and educational. There’s something about Geary’s grim, quiet presentation that brings the events to life without being sensationalistic, yet also seems kind of alien, with odd-looking people acting out terrible scenes that seem as foreign to us due to their inhumanity as their period garb and setting. And the goofy details that show up here and there make me smile; it seems like Geary is slipping a bit of humor into such a steadfastly dry relation of events.

Whether you’re interested in the details of history or just like to see good comics storytelling, this is a really good book, one that educates and fascinates, and kind of outrages, even when the events depicted are nearly a century old. That would be a remarkable accomplishment on its own, but when it’s just one example among many, you know you’re in the presence of great talent.”

Johanna Draper Carlson at Comics Worth Reading reviews Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“Trondheim’s comics differ from the usual online journal type in three significant ways, though:

  1. They’re watercolor, which make them feel more like “art”, less like something jotted on a napkin.
  2. Trondheim draws himself with a bird head, which makes events less about him, more universal.
  3. They’re about him going places and doing things. There’s lots of travel in these strips, providing unique viewpoints and plenty of attractive visual content.

Trondheim travels to many places I’d never think to go, so there’s a lot of enjoyment-by-proxy in these comics, wondering if I’d feel the same way or notice the same things if I visited. Probably not, given his somewhat crotchety attitude — which also makes the comics funny in a curmudgeonly way.

 It’s all gorgeous, in beautiful, subtle colors.”

Review round-up on a bunch o’ books

Marc Mason at Comics Waiting Room on 2 of our recent books: first on Sacco & Vanzetti:

“As with all the books he’s done in this series, he does his research, lays out the facts and evidence, and allows you to decide for yourself. That’s not only a hallmark of strong storytelling, but of confidence by the storyteller. He doesn’t need to pull you around by the nose if he has done his job right, and no one does the job right like Rick Geary. This is another incredible effort by a creator who simply seems to never swing and miss.”

And on Little Nothings 4:

“On the heels of Geary, LITTLE NOTHINGS VOL.4 arrived, and that’s about as happy as I get when it comes to comics. LITTLE NOTHINGS shows us a phenomenal talent at the peak of his powers. What more could you want?”

Over at Blogcritics, Bill Sherman is the first to review our freshly delivered Kinky & Cosy:

“The shiny die-cut cover to Kinky & Cosy (NBM) provides a strong indication of where this collection of comic strips is coming from:  featuring google-eyed headshots of the book’s eight-year-old title twins, the collection opens to the image of two grinning death’s head skulls. A series of gag comics by Belgian cartoonist Nix, the strip is being compared by its publisher to the “Katzenjammer Kids on speed,” which is fair enough, particularly in a strip which ends on the image of our trickster girls rolling on the ground. I also detect elements of the manga/anime series Shin Chan, particularly in the strip’s (mis)treatment of our heroines’ parents.”

An unlikely source for a review of The Jade Door in our Eurotica collection: Unshelved which is a daily comics blog also with reviews for… Librarians. Hey, who said Librarians aren’t cool?

“Why I finished it: The gorgeous art. Chaiko’s softly colored maid-and-master story opens and closes the anthology, wrapping the collection up nicely. The rest of the tales are more vibrantly hued, making the folktales seem more realistic than the comparably modern story of the girl reading them.”

See the book (You need to be over 18!)

Capt. Comics on Geary’s Sacco: “One of his best!”

The New York Journal of Books on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Mr. Geary is the sort of historian we all wanted to have in school or college: a teacher who makes history interesting and compelling. Thankfully now, we have him in graphic novel form. He is the supreme practitioner of the craft and genre today, and The Lives of Sacco & Vanzetti is as impressive as anything he has done. A fitting book for any educational institution wishing to get pupils interested in history and to prove that history is anything but boring and unexciting.”

And there are two interviews of  out there:

on Comics Bulletin

and on The Faster Times.

And Andrew ‘Captain Comics’ Smith at Scripps-Howard News service says:

“Brought to vivid, black-and-white life by Geary’s “The Lives of Sacco and Vanzetti” part of Geary’s “Treasury of XXth Century Murder” series. I’ve raved about Geary’s work before — not only his appropriately old-fashioned, woodcut-style, pen-and-ink artwork, but also his painstaking research and objectivity. This book is one of his best, a riveting and thorough documentary that leaves readers fully informed of all the evidence, pro and con, as if they were on a jury in a trial more just than the real one.”