Sky Over the Louvre: Library Journal and Foreword gush

“With gorgeous art intermixing beauty and weirdness, the story turns on the capriciousness of both history and art while providing a sense of a time and place where art ranked up there with liberté, égalité, and fraternité for an entire nation. With nudity and mature content; for academic and adult collections.”

Martha Cornog over at Library Journal

And another Library publication, Foreword, chimes in:

“Ultimately, The Sky Over the Louvre is successful on many levels, for many reasons. But chief among them is the fact that it is an engrossing tale of historical fiction that provides readers with rich and varied rewards.”

Reactions to the Louvre book + some School Library Journal reviews

“In The Sky Over the Louvre, Carrière builds up a story that uses David as a framework around which to touch on both the history of the Louvre and the complicated political passions of the time. It’s Yslaire’s layout and drafting, though, that really makes the book sing. The players in this drama are all realized as emotive caricatures, and when the story fall silent on the grand sweeping splash pages there’s a chill as the world of late 18th century Paris suddenly becomes real. In this sense it’s very reminiscent of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s From Hell in the way that it draws out the texture of the time, from the scum choked gutters to the cramped apartments.

For the fan of dramatic history, The Sky Over the Louvre is not to be missed; a sweeping graphic album that captures the creative and destructive passions of the French Revolution.”

Bleeding Cool

“Not only is this the most unique format for a graphic novel it’s probably the most unique graphic novel I’ve read. 8/10”

Player Affinity

School Library Journal reviews a number of our books in a recent issue. On Boneyard vol.7:

“Will not disappoint fans of the series. Young teen boys will most likely enjoy the action, humor and the heroines’ fashion sense.”

On De Crecy’s Salvatore vol.1:

“Unusual, surreal and poignant story. Definitely intended for older teens and adults as evidenced by its mature language and themes.”

Sky Over the Louvre: weather forecast varies.

Booklist’s Ray Olson found Sky Over the Louvre to be brought off ‘with singular panache on the part of artist Yslaire… This is bravura serious caricature.” but found scripter Carriere’s story to fall somewhat short of its potential.

Comics Waiting Room meanwhile is effusive:

“An artistic tour-de-force, yet it also tells the most relatable story we’ve seen from these books so far. What makes SKY work so well is that the creators do a superb job of helping the reader understand the timeframe in which the story takes place. The motivations, the social mores, the clothing, the abject terror… it leaps off the page and surrounds you as you go through the pages.

Highly recommended. Just like all the previous books in the Louvre series.”

And so is Brigid Alverson over at Robot 6 on Comic Book Resources:

“Sky Over the Louvre is the latest in NBM’s series of translations of graphic novels about the Louvre, and I think it’s the best so far. It’s a great read and left me wanting more.”

And then there’s this nice review done live on a radio station in Michigan, here’s the transcript (it’s short).

Story of Lee has sold out + some reviews

THE STORY OF LEE HAS SOLD OUT its first print run! Sorry that we’re temporarily out of stock while he rush back to press…
Meantime, a cute review by Erin Jameson at Playback:STL of A Story of Lee, entitled “A Love Less Traveled.”

Bill Sherman at Blogcritics sees an interesting parallel in Sky Over the Louvre with our times:

“Carriere effectively captures the debates of the day, the ways ideological purity can be used to rationalize atrocity, and imbues every seemingly intellectual debate with more than a hint of menace. In an era where a simple cartoon can spur true believers into violence, where a rising pool of writers judge art and entertainment on the basis of politics over anything, The Sky over the Louvre is more than a historical recreation. It’s a graphic novel for our polarized times.”

Lush & Beautiful

“Creating an effective graphic novel about classic art is no simple task, requiring a writer capable of conveying the drama of the artistic process, and an artist up to the challenge of producing images that do justice to the subject matter. Fortunately, Yslaire and Carriere have both. Will reward those who seek it out.”

Publishers Weekly

“I love NBM’s Louvre graphic novels, so how could I resist The Sky Over the Louvre, the latest addition, which looks lush and beautiful.”

Brigid Alverson, Comic Book Resources

Starred review for Salvatore and more…

“NBM ComicsLit’s partnership with The Louvre museum has produced another outstanding graphic novel. The Sky Over The Louvre almost couldn’t miss. It’s written by celebrated screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière (The Tin Drum, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie), and drawn by leading French artist Bernar Yslaire (Sambre), and both demonstrate the surefootedness of their experience in both quality and content.”

Andrew Smith, Scripps-Howards News and as seen in the Seattle Times and Memphis Commercial Appeal, amongst others.

“De Crécy’s loose, organic illustrations breathe life into his characters and give energy to his panel movement.
Verdict: De Crécy’s dry, witty humor combined with his endearing creatures makes a singular and worthy addition to comprehensive graphic novel collections.”

says Library Journal  of Salvatore in a starred review.

Converted

We convinced a sceptic critic on comics. The kind of review we LOVE to see, this one on the Sky Over the Louvre. First, setting the background on this book of Robespierre commissioning David to create a new Supreme Being:

“If you want the full account, you need to read a comic book.
 
Excuse me: a graphic novel.
 
Another surprise: This one has A-list credentials. 
 
The sponsor is the Louvre. The artist is the esteemed French cartoonist Bernar Yslaire. The writer is Jean-Claude Carrière, the favorite collaborator of Luis Buñuel; he wrote the screenplays for “Belle de Jour,” “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie” and “That Obscure Object of Desire,” among others.
 
But still…a graphic novel?
 
If you’re Old School like me, you haven’t jumped into this craze. At best, you think it’s a good idea for wired kids who grew up on comics and don’t have the attention span for real books. But for adults, a reasonable response to graphic novels would be: well….why?

“The Sky Over The Louvre” provokes a different response. Interest, for one. Understanding — even mastery — of a fascinating historical/art episode, for another. A powerful and enjoyable esthetic experience, for a third. And then, just to be shallow, there’s the cool factor — on a coffee table, this book makes you look good.
Was I self-conscious reading this book? Not once.
 
Did I get a better sense of David and Robespierre? Yes, and quickly.
 
Was I grateful for the art history lesson? Yes, and also for the way the paintings in this book are accurately copied and for two pages of artistic references.
More smart, beautiful hardcover comic books for grownups, please.”

Jesse Kornbluth, Head Butler. and picked up by the Huffington Post.

YES!YES! This is what we live for here! Another convert to our art form!

Makes my day. Keeps me going as I have for *gasp* 35 years.