Story of O by Crepax on Comixology

Comixology today has posted their next title in our Eurotica imprint, Guido Crepax’ famous adaptation of Pauline Reage’s THE STORY OF O, a classic of submission and bondage.

Check it out!

Our print book has been out of stock, we will go back to press at some point. So right now, this is how you can get it!

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Slate on O

Sasha Watson strikes again this time on the Slate site with a great piece on our Story of O and its background . The anonymous author’s ‘coming out’ in the New Yorker in 1994 brought forth some juicy details…

“What’s shocking about Story of O is just how shocking it really is. You’d think, in our pornified culture, that a novel scandalous in 1954 might appear quaint today. But no. Aury delivers the hard stuff straight on, and it’s just as potent now as it was back then.”

Week in reviews

Joe & Azat in the Smithsonian?

Indeed, a nice review of Jesse Lonergan’s Joe & Azat at the Smithsonian site:

“Joe’s best guide is local Azat, “the computer expert at the education department” – never mind that the entire department has but one computer. Azat, “the greatest dreamer [Joe] ever met” is also his best friend in Turkmenistan. Azat makes sure Joe gets his stolen passport back, tastes the best cooking (including his mother’s manty), meets a few of the local girls (at least one of whom Joe should marry), and enjoys every wedding with or without an invitation. In return, Joe puts up with Azat’s bully-of-an-older brother, listens to Azat’s nonsensical schemes to get rich, commiserates with Azat’s yearning for a girl he can’t have, and patiently tries to answer one absurd question after another.”

Publishers Weekly had six critics round up the best of 2009 and our Story of O and Year of Loving Dangerously made the list. Also, Augie De Bliek, Jr. at Comic Book Resources puts Trondheim’s Little Nothings 2 in the top of 2009.

Speaking of CBR, Jason Sacks there says of Royo’s newly remastered collection Malefic: “You can’t ask for a more beautifully produced collection of fantasy art than Malefic.”   And Andrew “Capt. Comics” Smith , syndicated in many papers through Scripps says of it:

“A very beautiful book, both in format and content. Royo is an absolute master of his craft, creating incredibly gorgeous and expressive women (and sometimes men), and switching easily from fantasy to sci-fi to horror.”

Sequential Tart on O

Sequential Tart has a very well researched review, brings up some interesting background.

“The story stands the test of time, partly because it is a catalogue of classic pornographic and Sadean tropes (Susan Sontag called The Story of O “meta-pornography”), but also because it has a purposely retro feel. Crepax gives the comic a flapper-era aesthetic that calls upon a timeless, iconic era of libertine feminism.

Crepax, who was a successful advertising illustrator, also knew the power of suggestion. While he does not shy away from explicit depictions of sex and BDSM activities, he also knows when to pull back and let comics do what they do best: allow the reader to imagine what happens between scenes, just outside the panel, in the next frame, or elsewhere on O’s body.
The true selling point of this edition of The Story of O is the production. Printed on a bright white, opaque stock, Crepax’s linework comes to life, with the flow of ink, the physical weight of the hand and turns of the wrist evident in every line.  The NBM edition of The Story of O is a solid, very reasonable priced standalone volume.”

Ain’titcool: Story of O

A rave with reservations if that can be. While Ain’t It Cool News was at times appalled by what O goes through, even calling the book mysoginistic (which means he didn’t really get it) he waxes lyrical about Crepax’ adaptation of it:

“First of all, the Eurotica imprint of NBM Publishing has done a beautiful job of packaging this book together.
Crepax is a master storyteller and he wields a lyrical brush. His style is beautiful with a nouveau tendency towards elongated bodies and necks especially…but not grotesquely so. The smoothness of his brush work just glides across the page in most instances and only in the most intense moments does he allow his work to get rough and scratchy.
O is never less than always beautifully sexual. Crepax makes sure that her sexual beauty draws the reader’s eye even when the heart or mind might want to pull away from the events that are unfolding.
The beauty of Crepax’s art somehow makes it palatable and I found it to be something I couldn’t put down…
Guido Crepax truly was a master storyteller, and while he may have focused his talents in an area that many are afraid to go, if you can handle the content, Crepax’s THE STORY OF O is actually a must-have for those who love graphic storytelling in all its many forms.”

heh, heh, we really pushed his buttons.

Story of O reviewed by Skin Two

The famous art magazine of bondage Skin Two and its chief Tim Woodward reviews our Story of O:

“Guido Crepax, the great pioneer of sensual graphic comics, uses multi-panelled pages to give the impression that you are peeping through a keyhole into O’s world of SM submission. She gives herself up to bondage, humiliation, sex with multiple partners, sodomy and even gets branded, all because it is the desire of her lover. This hardcover edition is a real collectors’ item.”

Jazma Online, while taken aback at the acts O lets herself be directed to do, chimes in:

“How to make a woman your slave so she will do anything for you. Not only do it but love doing it.
The art really stands out.”

Story of O, Joe & Azat and Things Undone news

First one out of the gate, the site Comics Waiting Room‘s Avril Brown saying this:

“From the very first page it is apparent why THE STORY OF O is recognized as Crepax’s finest work. The fine, sharp pencils turn each panel into a vintage etching. Some are fractured panels, giving the effect of seeing these sexual acts in a cracked mirror, and others are overlapping, yet all are uniquely visceral and stimulating. This is not a story of men abusing women or women feeling weak, this is a story of willful submission. O makes her choice and revels in it, even introducing other women to this world.”

Boston’s Weekly Dig calls Joe & Azat by Jesse Lonergan “a damn cool book”, the reviewer admits to this being her first graphic novel and loving it. Cute.

And for Things Undone:

White’s humor is pretty lighthearted, considering the subject matter, darkening only until the end when Rick acquires a handgun and contemplates suicide. It’s tough to get too down, however, by a book whose every page is colored in pumpkin-orange. “—Rod Lott of Bookgasm