Catp. Comics, Teacher Librarian and Unshelved on our books (and more)

Ernie Colon gets an excellent interview over at Comics Bulletin by Jason Sacks. And Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith over at Scripps Howard News Service has this to say about it:

“[Colon] can scare the pants off you. I highly recommend “Inner Sanctum,” which ought to come with a reinforced belt.”

Smith (same review) also has come around on Salvatore. Where he hated vol.1, now with volume 2:

“An Eventful Crossing” has changed my mind entirely. All the stories are progressing dramatically and are holding my interest, and what I interpreted as inane, random dialogue in the first book has transformed into solid (and funny) characterization. I was wrong to dismiss this book as an artist’s self-indulgence, and hope now to correct my error. “Salvatore” is initially hard to embrace, because it is a story that refuses to conform to expectation and classification. But it’s that very quality that’s making it a unique and entertaining read for me now.”

Gene Ambaum at Unshelved, a site beloved by Librarians, recommends Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:
“I read everything by Trondheim that’s available in English. But I would have picked this up for the cover alone.”

It is also reviewed at Playback:stl.

Comic Book Resources chooses Rohan at the Louvre as one of 12 to look forward to this year.

“Geary’s historical mysteries always sparkle with clarity, both in the artwork and plot.”

Joe Sutliff Sanders, Teacher Librarian on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti

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Booklist and Smithsonian chime in on Stargazing Dog.

Stargazing Dog gets another appreciative nod this time from the Smithsonian magazine online.

And Booklist is about to publish this review of it:

“Reading this graphic novel is the emotional equivalent to listening to NPR’s StoryCorps—moving, beautiful, and ultimately heart-wrenching.”

Dungeon  Monstres 3 and 4 get good reviews from Unshelved, a favorite comics blog amongst Librarians, calling the series “a fabulous array of five inter-related graphic novel series.”

Review round-up on a bunch o’ books

Marc Mason at Comics Waiting Room on 2 of our recent books: first on Sacco & Vanzetti:

“As with all the books he’s done in this series, he does his research, lays out the facts and evidence, and allows you to decide for yourself. That’s not only a hallmark of strong storytelling, but of confidence by the storyteller. He doesn’t need to pull you around by the nose if he has done his job right, and no one does the job right like Rick Geary. This is another incredible effort by a creator who simply seems to never swing and miss.”

And on Little Nothings 4:

“On the heels of Geary, LITTLE NOTHINGS VOL.4 arrived, and that’s about as happy as I get when it comes to comics. LITTLE NOTHINGS shows us a phenomenal talent at the peak of his powers. What more could you want?”

Over at Blogcritics, Bill Sherman is the first to review our freshly delivered Kinky & Cosy:

“The shiny die-cut cover to Kinky & Cosy (NBM) provides a strong indication of where this collection of comic strips is coming from:  featuring google-eyed headshots of the book’s eight-year-old title twins, the collection opens to the image of two grinning death’s head skulls. A series of gag comics by Belgian cartoonist Nix, the strip is being compared by its publisher to the “Katzenjammer Kids on speed,” which is fair enough, particularly in a strip which ends on the image of our trickster girls rolling on the ground. I also detect elements of the manga/anime series Shin Chan, particularly in the strip’s (mis)treatment of our heroines’ parents.”

An unlikely source for a review of The Jade Door in our Eurotica collection: Unshelved which is a daily comics blog also with reviews for… Librarians. Hey, who said Librarians aren’t cool?

“Why I finished it: The gorgeous art. Chaiko’s softly colored maid-and-master story opens and closes the anthology, wrapping the collection up nicely. The rest of the tales are more vibrantly hued, making the folktales seem more realistic than the comparably modern story of the girl reading them.”

See the book (You need to be over 18!)